Archive for November, 2011

Nukers found to have manipulated Japanese public opinion – SOP.

November 30, 2011

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20111130p2a00m0na015000c.html

Hokkaido governor admits gov’t attempt to manipulate opinion on ‘pluthermal’ plan

SAPPORO — Hokkaido Gov. Harumi Takahashi has admitted the prefectural government’s involvement in Hokkaido Electric Power Co.’s alleged attempt to manipulate public opinion on a “pluthermal” plan at its nuclear plant.

Takahashi told a prefectural assembly session on Nov. 29 that she has “decided to accept” a third party fact-finding panel’s report, which concludes that an official who headed the prefectural government’s nuclear safety division was involved in the case.

When the power supplier’s third party panel initially pointed to the possibility of the prefectural government’s involvement, the governor categorically denied the allegations saying, “That’s absolutely impossible.”

However, on Nov. 29 Takahashi told the assembly, “It was inappropriate that the division chief in charge made remarks that could be interpreted as asking (employees of the utility to express their opinions as local residents in favor of the project).”

The governor also suggested that she will punish herself and other officials concerned, and take measures to prevent a recurrence.

“I’ll clarify the prefectural government’s responsibility for the case, including my own supervisory responsibility, while taking remedial measures such as awareness-raising efforts for high-ranking officials,” she said.

Even though she stopped short of specifying punitive measures against top officials including herself, sources with the prefectural government said she is considering cutting her salary.

Takahashi denied that the power supplier’s alleged attempt to manipulate public opinion had any influence on the local government’s decision on whether to approve the project. “The fact-finding committee has concluded it’s impossible that what has been deemed as Hokkaido Electric Power Co.’s inappropriate action had any influence on our prior consent.”

Some members of the Hokkaido Prefectural Assembly expressed dissatisfaction with the governor’s explanation.

“The prefectural government’s decision to close the curtain on the case after concluding that the division chief in charge attempted to manipulate public opinion solely at his own discretion can’t win understanding from prefectural residents,” one of them said.

An opposition member of the assembly criticized Takahashi’s lack of apology as “insincere.”

Pluthermal refers to projects in which MOX fuel made by mixing plutonium and uranium is used in thermal reactors at nuclear power plants.

Click here for the original Japanese story

(Mainichi Japan) November 30, 2011

Andrew Bolt should move to Hokkaido. Along with a couple of academics, one from Adelaide Uni and one from Flinders Uni.

Fukushima Pref. to decommission all 10 local nuke reactors

November 30, 2011

(This’ll take 50 years after switch off probably).

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20111130p2a00m0na016000c.html

The Fukushima Prefectural Government has decided to decommission all 10 reactors in its jurisdiction, including those at the Fukushima No. 2 nuclear plant, in conjunction with its disaster recovery project, it has been learned.

A vision for restoration created by the prefectural government in August promoted the formation of a “society not relying on nuclear power,” but made no actual reference to decommissioning reactors. Fukushima Gov. Yuhei Sato was expected to formally announce the measure in a news conference on Nov. 30.
In this March 20, 2011 aerial file photo taken by a small unmanned drone and released by Air Photo Service, the crippled Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is seen in Okumamachi, Fukushima prefecture. From top to bottom: Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3 and Unit 4. (AP Photo/Air Photo Service)
In this March 20, 2011 aerial file photo taken by a small unmanned drone and released by Air Photo Service, the crippled Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is seen in Okumamachi, Fukushima prefecture. From top to bottom: Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3 and Unit 4. (AP Photo/Air Photo Service)

Earlier, Sato stated that the No. 1 to 4 reactors at the damaged Fukushima No. 1 nuclear complex would be decommissioned, but when it came to the plant’s No. 5 and No. 6 reactors and those at the Fukushima No. 2 plant, he had simply stated, “It is inconceivable to restart them.”

In October the Fukushima Prefectural Assembly adopted a petition seeking decommissioning of all reactors in the prefecture.
In this image released Saturday, April 16, 2011, by Tokyo Electric Power Co., top of the container of the nuclear reactor, painted in yellow, of Unit 4 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant is observed from its side with a T-Hawk drone Friday, April 15, 2011 in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)
In this image released Saturday, April 16, 2011, by Tokyo Electric Power Co., top of the container of the nuclear reactor, painted in yellow, of Unit 4 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant is observed from its side with a T-Hawk drone Friday, April 15, 2011 in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)

In a meeting on the morning of Nov. 30, prefectural officials discussed how the decommissioning of reactors would affect employment and the finances of local bodies. Yoichi Nozaki, a prefectural official in charge of the restoration project, stressed that the prefecture’s principles had not changed.

“The principle of moving away from nuclear power, which was put forward in our vision for restoration, has not changed,” he said. “In the future we will have a Fukushima Prefecture without nuclear power.”

Click here for the original Japanese story

(Mainichi Japan) November 30, 2011

Andrew Bolt’s attempt to bolster uranium share prices are looking pretty weak.

Melted nuclear fuel eroded reactor container by up to 65 cm: TEPCO

November 30, 2011

This is no news to many. Enhanced erosion of metal in reactors has been a problem since the Manhattan Project days, when Bradford Shank and others worked on the problem at Los Alamos. Tepco’s use of seawater was an attempt to cover up and present self sufficiency when US experts were aghast.

The intermittent ongoing criticality of the molten cores and the resultant neutron flux in the presence of water simply accelerates the process. The longer it goes on, the greater the chance of reactor vessel damage of far greater magnitude than has occurred already.

The Mainichi Daily explains:

Melted nuclear fuel eroded reactor container by up to 65 cm: TEPCO
In this image released Saturday, April 16, 2011, by Tokyo Electric Power Co., top of the container of the nuclear reactor, painted in yellow, of Unit 4 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant is observed from its side with a T-Hawk drone Friday, April 15, 2011 in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)
In this image released Saturday, April 16, 2011, by Tokyo Electric Power Co., top of the container of the nuclear reactor, painted in yellow, of Unit 4 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Plant is observed from its side with a T-Hawk drone Friday, April 15, 2011 in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)

TOKYO (Kyodo) — The operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant said Wednesday that the concrete base of the No. 1 reactor container had been eroded by up to 65 centimeters when the fuel inside melted, although the steel container itself was left intact.

According to Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s analysis, all of the fuel inside the No. 1 reactor melted after cooling functions failed in the wake of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, with a substantial amount of the fuel melting through the base of the reactor pressure vessel and dropping into the outer primary container.
In this March 12, 2011 image made from video from NTV Japan via APTN, smoke rises from Unit 1 of the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture. (AP Photo/NTV Japan via APTN)
In this March 12, 2011 image made from video from NTV Japan via APTN, smoke rises from Unit 1 of the Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture. (AP Photo/NTV Japan via APTN)

If the erosion had expanded another 37 cm, the damage would have reached the steel wall, according to the utility known as TEPCO.

As for the Nos. 2 and 3 reactors, which also experienced meltdowns, the amount of fuel that dropped to the bottom of the pressure vessel is estimated to be around 60 percent.
Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant’s No. 1 reactor building, with its nearly-completed cover, is seen on Oct. 8 in this photo provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co.
Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant’s No. 1 reactor building, with its nearly-completed cover, is seen on Oct. 8 in this photo provided by Tokyo Electric Power Co.

The bottom of the two reactors’ pressure vessels is unlikely to have been damaged on a large scale. But if the fuel had melted through the vessels, the primary container of the No. 2 reactor could have been eroded by 12 cm and that of the No. 3 reactor by 20 cm, TEPCO said.

Currently, the melted fuel inside the Nos. 1 to 3 reactors is believed to be cooled by water injection and no further erosion is occurring, it said.

(Mainichi Japan) November 30, 2011 http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20111130p2g00m0dm147000c.html

I disagree with the idea that “no further erosion is occurring”. That’s got to be crap. Water plus neutrons and gamma = Hydrogen peroxide. Some coolant. Fill your car up with that and see how long the metal in your engine lasts.

See also http://jcwren.chem.uwo.ca/research.html

http://jcwren.chem.uwo.ca/research.html#steel

Another point in this article is the contining “Tepco don’t know” situation eg “IF the fuel had melted through the vessels, the primary container of the No. 2 reactor could have been eroded by 12 cm and that of the No. 3 reactor by 20 cm, TEPCO said.”

For 60 years the nuclear industry reckoned it knew it all. That ordinary were ignorant. Reverse is true. It seems to me. If this was 1954, I’d be called a Communist by General Electric and if American, the State Department would take my passport away, like they did to Linus Pauling.

These days, well, I’m just a fanatic according to them. Na, I’m just a Mac geek who likes writing the truth because it gives an excuse to crank up the Macbook.

It’s all Steve Jobs fault.

Think Different. Think truth. Anyway, on with the show.

From Clara Wren’s research site at http://jcwren.chem.uwo.ca/research.html#steel

One important topic is the effect of gamma radiation during nuclear plant operation,
as it pertains to corrosion of steels. We look at many materials, but here are a few
interesting results from carbon steel at pH 10.6.

The effect of the gamma radiation is to drive the steel to a more oxidizing potential as
this experiment shows, regardless how the initial steel is treated. When we ramp up
the temperature, we can make thick films, and we see differences between radiation
and no radiation cases. In both cases, notice how the oxide is very uniform.

Sure enough, the oxide film is a little thicker after a few hours when radiation is
applied. HOWEVER, the outer layers are slightly different, as no radiation leaves a
slightly amorphous film. Does this lead to less or more corrosion over time? We’ll let
you know…

Now about those uniform films… This is thanks to the pH we have picked (10.6,
similar to room temperature CANDU coolant). This pH finds a nice low solubility for
iron cations, particularly enhanced for Fe(II) – containing species. Take a look at our
solubility diagram, and the comparative pH 7 films, which are rough/patchy.

At pH 7, the higher corrosion potential will likely cause more corrosion, since Fe(II)
species will dissolve away. The film structure would agree with this, as a very rough
surface is formed, consistent with dissolution/precipitation.

Radiation Related Aqueous and Colloid Chemistry
Most of the time, water is relegated to a couple of roles in corrosion processes:
Hydrogen evolution to support corrosion of active species and transportation/solvation
of species necessary for corrosion.
Within an environment subject to ionizing radiation, water can play a more active role
in corrosion. When high energy radiation interacts with water, a host of species is
formed, including solvated electrons, hydrogen peroxide, superoxide and hydrogen
and oxygen gases. These species change the chemistry of the water, and alter the
corrosion behaviour of associated steels. The process is outlined below:

end quote.

Finally, the more water TEPCO dumps in the reactors, the greater the chance of water moderated fission occurring in the still molten cores. That the cores remain molten is confirmed by the Mainichi article above, which quotes TEPCO. TEPCO does not know precisely where the corium are. Much has been made of the fact that the reactor temperatures have dropped below 100 degrees. Not surprising seeing as the molten fuel has done an Elvis. Its left the building.

The limitations of reactors in this situation are not TEPCO’s fault. Except that they bought and operate them. GE salesmen must have been pretty good at what they did.

These uncertainties regarding the state of the Fukushima reactors, which continue to vent fission and fuel particles, make a full evacuation of the wider Fukushima area crucial if safety of people, rather than the limiting of costs to TEPCO, are to be the main priority.

Living in the aftermath of tragedy: Finding a parallel in Hiroshima

November 30, 2011

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/perspectives/news/20111130p2a00m0na007000c.html

Living in the aftermath of tragedy: Finding a parallel in Hiroshima
Doves fly by the gutted Atomic Bomb Dome, center background, preserved as a landmark for the tribute to the A-bomb attack, following a speech delivered by Prime Minister Naoto Kan to marking the 66th anniversary of the world’s first atomic bombing, at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on Saturday, Aug, 6, 2011. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
Doves fly by the gutted Atomic Bomb Dome, center background, preserved as a landmark for the tribute to the A-bomb attack, following a speech delivered by Prime Minister Naoto Kan to marking the 66th anniversary of the world’s first atomic bombing, at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on Saturday, Aug, 6, 2011. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)

I recently attended an exhibition titled “To Live — August 6, 1945 — From That Day Forth,” which is being held in the East Building of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum through Dec. 14.

The exhibition questions what kind of atrocities the atomic bombing of Hiroshima during World War II inflicted on people in the latter half of their lives, and how they lived amid such trials. This issue tends to be overlooked, but it is a touching theme.

On display at the exhibition are items such as belongings of those who perished, as well as photographs and video footage. The people featured in the exhibition include a couple who kept the clothes of their only son who died in the atomic bombing but never spoke about it, as well as parents who protected and raised their children after they were exposed to radiation in the womb. Another attraction is a woman who lost 13 relatives and raised her children while suffering the effects of radiation poisoning from the bombing. She was also subjected to prejudice but still found time to take care of the Atomic Bomb Memorial Mound for four decades.

The expressions of some of the people in the snapshots are calm, but one can sense the weight of time that they have shouldered.

Also featured in the exhibition are celebrities, scholars, and journalists. Koishi Kimi, a comic storyteller who died this year, experienced the atomic bombing while serving as a soldier near Hiroshima Castle. He was trapped under rubble but rescued, and after receiving emergency treatment he was taken to Ninoshima Island in Hiroshima Bay, where he received medical care.

Kimi hardly ever spoke about his experience in the bombing. He explained the reason for this in a video produced in his later years, saying, “The very fact that I was living while so many others had died made me ashamed.”

Kimi started comic storytelling with his older brother before the war, but after leaving the army and going back to Osaka, he felt he could not resume his comedy act. He said he was reluctant to engage in work that made people laugh. He never applied for an atomic bomb survivor’s certificate.

Another survivor was Masao Maruyama, a political scientist who belonged to the Hiroshima Army Marine Headquarters (commonly known as the Akatsuki Corps). He experienced the atomic bombing during a morning assembly but avoided being hit directly by the flash or blast because he was shielded by a control tower.

The Akatsuki Corps put boats out into rivers to rescue civilians — and in fact my parents and sisters were among those rescued. Maruyama went with a group of reporters to investigate the area around the hypocenter three days after the bombing.

An explanation at the exhibition says that in 1969, Maruyama revealed his experiences in the Chugoku Shimbun newspaper, stating, “Hiroshima is a reality that is occurring daily. It is challenging us with new issues each and every day.”

Yoshito Matsushige, who worked as a photographer at the Chugoku Shimbun, is also featured at the exhibition. Confronted with utter tragedy, he was unable to bring himself to take photos, and snapped just five. I was moved by one showing an officer sitting at a desk outside issuing certificates for victims of the bombing even though he was injured himself, with an apparently bloodstained bandage around his head. Residents needed disaster certificates to receive relief supplies.

Throughout his life, Matsushige worked to preserve photographs showing the aftermath of the atomic bombing.

Since March 11, when Japan was struck by a magnitude-9.0 earthquake that triggered a massive tsunami and a nuclear crisis that has yet to be resolved, media organizations in Japan have focused on the day-to-day lives and emotions of people in disaster areas, and have presented projects and articles to support them through information. The Mainichi Shimbun’s “Kibo Shimbun” (Hope Newspaper) and similar projects could be viewed as part of these efforts. They represent the certainty of people’s ongoing lives and thoughts. I feel that there is something in common between these things and what I felt when I attended the exhibition. (By Kenji Tamaki, Expert Senior Writer)

Click here for the original Japanese story

(Mainichi Japan) November 30, 2011

Pray for Japan. Evacuate Fukushima.

Frontline Films Australia – David Bradbury

November 30, 2011

http://www.frontlinefilms.com.au/profile.htm

http://www.frontlinefilms.com.au/videos/hardrain.htm
This is a documentary that had to be made! Twice Academy award nominee and five times AFI winner David Bradbury’s latest contribution, A Hard Rain, explores the ‘other side’ of the nuclear debate.

Governments and most mainstream media are promoting that nuclear is now an attractive alternative to fossil fuels – the magic fix that will save us all from global warming. Nuclear power has taken on a clean and green spin from the low point 20 years ago which saw the Chernobyl meltdown.

Traversing five countries – China, France, UK, Japan and Australia, and using what Bradbury learnt from his previous three nuclear documentaries (Public Enemy Number One, Jabiluka and Blowin’ in the Wind), A Hard Rain takes a closer look at the global nuclear industry in its entirety – from the mining of uranium through to the nuclear power plant to the radioactive waste and weapons manufacturing. It exposes the hidden agendas behind this latest push for Australia to go nuclear.

Included are interviews with some of the world’s top scientists and environmentalists on the subject such as Dr Rosalie Bertell from Canada, Dr Chris Busby from the UK, and from Australia, Dr Mark Diesendorf (Ex CSIRO) from the Environmental Institute at the University of NSW, Prof. Ian Lowe, President of the Australian Conservation Foundation, and Dr Gavin Mudd from the Monash University Engineering Department.

Interviews with traditional owners who have been locked out of genuine consultation with what is happening on their country is also included in this film.

By looking at the experience of countries overseas that have gone nuclear, A Hard Rain debunks some of the myths of the nuclear industry: that nuclear is safe, cheap, health and green with little chance of another Chernobyl happening.

If you want vital and factual information to debate the issue intelligently and overthrow the myths that the nuclear and pro uranium mining lobby has so successfully implanted in the media, in the government and the Labor Party, then this documentary is a must see.

View excerpt of A Hard Rain (at the link)


http://www.frontlinefilms.com.au/videos/blowin.htm

Blowin’ in the Wind examines the secret treaty that allows the US military to train and test its weaponry on Australian soil. It looks at the impact of recycled uranium weapons and the far-reaching physical and moral effects on every Australian. The film’s release has been timely as the government currently moves to approve more uranium mines while arguing the contrary – that by going nuclear we are being both ‘safe’ and ‘green’.

Blowin’ In The Wind reveals that Iraqi babies are now being born with major birth defects. Bradbury wonders whether Australians living downwind from the military testing ranges will be next. He argues that we were lied to by the British over the Woomera and Maralinga atomic tests. Can we trust another equally powerful partner in our ‘war on terror’? With a cash budget of just $12,000 Blowin’ In The Wind raises pertinent questions which cannot be ignored by the Australian public. The film shocked, angered and surprised large audiences when shown at the Sydney and Brisbane Film Festivals.

Director’s Statement (David Bradbury)

This is a film that very much wanted to find me. I tried to fend it off, exhausted from making environmental and political films on shoestring budgets that told hard truths to my fellow Australians that they needed to hear but preferred to ignore. In today’s climate of self censorship, and public broadcasters who fear that their political masters in Canberra will still further cut their budgets if they support these sorts of films, fellow filmmaker Peter Scott and I pushed on regardless. With a hard cash budget of $12,000 and a beg, borrow or make do philosophy…and a lot of favours, we’ve pulled together this doco I know you’ll never see on ‘your ABC’. The picture it paints and the consequences for us all if we don’t raise our protest loud and long to this new military alliance with the United States is too devastating to ignore.

The Paddy McGuinness’s, the Gerard Henderson’s and Greg Sheridan’s of this world with their sycophantic attitudes towards their media masters and ruling class elite will have a field day in attempting to put this film down, to write it off as ‘propaganda’, typical anti-American sentiment with no substance. It’s time for all of us to draw a line in the sand, to acknowledge whether we are in fact happy to be the 51st state of America.

More than ever, it’s time for us all to stand up and be counted for the decency and genuine moral values of what I believed as a kid it meant to be ‘a fair dinkum’ Australian. Not a false, jingoistic patriotism that is built on fear, that justifies war crimes in the name of the so-called War on Terror. Rather, I embrace a healthy nationalism that acknowledges who we are as Australians with compassion for the underdog and giving everyone a fair go. In a humble but sincere way, I hope this film made with a lot of heart and commitment can play a small but important role in galvanising a lot of us to do just that.

Already seen Blowin’ In The Wind?
Shocked? Angered? Scared by what you’ve seen?

http://www.dusk-qld.info is the site to visit for action ideas of what you can do to stop this nuclear madness! Go there to get involved… and tell your friends.

Follow this:

November 30, 2011

http://dedicatedtothemysterysurroundingthe2tsunamidogs.com/

and this

http://fukushima-diary.com/

Ordinary people doing what the media should be doing.

The Uranium lobby here in Australia is successfully suppressing news and facts.

A reader writes. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/20/fukushima-plant-disaster-long-term-effects_n_1103874.html

November 30, 2011

I wanted to thank you for all your hard work, esp TODAY with your posts on fission, how long they’ve known ect. Incredible findings!!

I check you website daily and link relevant articles on Japan HERE.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/20/fukushima-plant-disaster-long-term-effects_n_1103874.html
The posters at HP are “regulars” who have been watching this disaster unfold since 3/11. Like you, we see no end in sight and believe Japan should be evacuated ASAP. (at least the Children!!)
DAILY we are bombarded by Pro-Nukers @ Huffington who keep downplaying the Radiation. “No worse than x-rays” (you know the drill)
We are members at Enenews too.
http://enenews.com/
Anyway, thanks for all you do. Outstanding work! Keep it up!!
Whoopie

Thanks Whoopie. There’s a French Chef in Tokyo named Nelson doing a lot.

What did authorities do with the bio effects knowledge of the fission products originated in the 1940s?

November 30, 2011

They made it secret under the Atomic Energy Act. Even though it was published pre Manhattan Project.

See the letter from Hamilton to Dunham re Pecher’s Strontium 89 knowledge and Lawrence’s P32 knowledge here:

http://www.mediafire.com/?rmycaab323x5289

(It’s the “Dear Chuck” letter of 1954, in which Hamilton admits that the medical staff at the UCLA hospital had no idea of the classified nature of the medical treatment they used was secret.) Hamilton: “Please find enclosed the available data from the University of California Hospital which was compiled by members of Stone’s staff who incidentally are quite unaware of the classified nature of this material. I discussed this matter with Dr. Stone and told him that it should not be discussed with anyone in the Division of Radiology with the exception of the two of us. …
Download the whole thing, as there are other documents attached of interest.

Even though the material had been published in academic texts – as made available here in these posts – it lay going mouldy in University libraries. No doubt though Dr Marston read the material as it arrived in Adelaide at the time. Hence the thorn he presented to authorities at the time.

I wonder if there is a modern day Hamilton running around hospitals in Japan saying, like Hamilton did in 1954 that radiation related health effects “should not be discussed with anyone …. with the exception of J Gov and TEPCO and BHP”. And maybe, just maybe, “Tell Bolt to say this and to say that in the Australian media, but remember to tell him he’s a mushroom too.”

I really wonder. Is he a mushroom ? Or does he know?

Anyway, enough about Bolt. He’s not worth the electronic ink.

Source for the “Dear Chuck” letter from Hamilton is the US Department of Energy Opennet Archives. As ordered by Clinton’s Openness Executive Order. Which the DOE fighting back from ever since 1994.

The Children’s Graveyard at Woomera South Australia.

November 30, 2011

Recap:
sr bones

cemetary

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/south-australians-join-class-action-against-britain-for-maralinga-related-deaths/story-e6frea83-1225835365819

SECRET records detailing the fate of dozens of babies born in the shadow of Maralinga’s nuclear testing hold the key to a case building as the state’s largest class action.

More than 100 South Australians have joined a class action against the British Ministry of Defence over deaths and disabilities they believe were caused by nuclear testing at Maralinga more than 50 years ago.

Among them are families of the Woomera babies – more than 60 lives lost, many without explanation, during the decade of nuclear testing, up to 600km away.

Lawyers running the case say it is “just the tip of the iceberg”. They have heard only from people who are “very confident” they have a case for compensation.

Already, families of some of the stillborn children, hours-old babies and toddlers who account for more than half the plots in Woomera Cemetery for the 1950s and 1960s, have come forward.

Edith Hiskins, 79, of Willaston, gave birth to a stillborn daughter, Helene Michelle, in March 1963, and still is not satisfied with the reason given for her baby’s death.

Mrs Hiskins, and her husband John, a serviceman at Woomera, were told the baby girl was stillborn due to “mild toxemia” – a cause not given until years after her death and only after they pushed authorities for a death certificate.

The parents never saw their daughter , who was buried in the cemetery the next day, and they have never seen her medical records. “I would like some answers as to why that happened, because the answers given on her death certificate, I do not find sufficient,” Mrs Hiskins said.

“As far as I know, her records were sealed. It was years before we even got a death certificate.”

Mrs Hiskins said she, or her family, are likely to join the class action. “There are still questions to be answered and reasons to be given,” she said.

In all, the Woomera Cemetery contains 23 graves for stillborn babies born in the hospital between December 1953 and September 1968, and a further 46 graves for other children who died around that period. Autopsies were not always conducted and it is understood the medical records of those 23 stillborn babies remain sealed and held by the National Archives of Australia.

Now, as British lawyers search for others to join the class action against the British Ministry of Defence, they will also push for the secrets of the Woomera baby graves to be revealed.

Hickman & Rose partners Anna Mazzola and Beth Handley, working with the Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement in Adelaide, have collected more than 100 names of people who believe they could join a class action for compensation from the British Government.

They will apply for the records of the Woomera babies to be made public.

Secrecy surrounding the disturbing rate of baby deaths and research suggesting fallout from tests blanketed the town despite being more than 600km from the Maralinga testing sites, warrants those families investigating claims as part of the class act, Ms Mazzola says.

“There are probably about 100 people who have come forward at the moment, but that’s really only the tip of the iceberg,” she said.

“They are primary victims who were there at the time or secondary victims – the children who were either disabled by the contamination or had ailments and disabilities passed on by their parents.”The Hickman & Rose team is working with private injury firm Stacks Goudkamp, which is representing Australian ex-military claimants.

The claims follow the lead of a class action lodged on behalf of British ex-servicemen affected by the tests during the ’50s and ’60s.

The legal team is headed by Cherie Booth, QC – the wife of the former British prime minister Tony Blair.

It lodged the case after British soldiers also affected by radiation exposure were granted permission to sue their government last year.

“It could take years to get a result,” Ms Mazzola warned.

“It’s clearly such a significant case.

“We’re talking about generations of people who have suffered injuries and disabilities as a result of the tests and, for most of them, that’s never been acknowledged.

“It seems the British Government undertook those tests without finding out where people were living and without any real consideration of the consequences, and they need to be held accountable.”

end quote.

The Federal Government still refuses to release the relevant medical records from Maralinga and Pt Augusta Hospital. They are sealed. Government sources stated that they can’t find the Maralinga Hospital documents. Oh, Ok, I’m totally brainless, but I don’t belive that. The Federal Government refused to exhume the bodies of babies who died en masse in 1957 at Ernabella following a Maralinga bomb series, claiming the mass deaths were caused by flu and rubella. Though no doctor diagnosed the illnesses.

What pressure is being put on Japanese medicos today to keep records secret?

What have they been doing with the knowledge of the harms of the fission products originated in the 1940s? Let’s see.

Radiation from Medical Procedures in the Pathogenesis of Cancer and Ischemic Heart Disease: Dose-Response Studies with Physicians per 100,000 Population by Dr John Gofman

November 30, 2011

http://www.ratical.org/radiation/CNR/RMP/