IAEA – the management of Carbon 14 and Tritium from fission production plants

http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/TRS421_web.pdf

“Carbon-14 and tritium are radioisotopes produced as a by-product or
special product in various nuclear reactor systems..”

Time for a radio carbon free future I think. And a radio strontium free and a tritium free, and a radio iodine free and so on and on and on…and an incompetence free and a nuke pollution denialist free …future.

Is there one? The technology is there. But it isnt used due to the political and economic blackmail of nuclear industrial moguls.

they write these fancy texts they know they have no hope of complying with. And it sucks in the dumb politicians. Eg:

IAEA : “Owing to their relatively long half-lives, high residence time in the
environment, high isotopic exchange rate and ease of assimilation into living
matter, it is necessary to control their production at nuclear facilities.
There is also a requirement for the proper management of related waste and material,
because of the potential impact on human health.
The purpose of this report is
to review and analyse experience in the application of different organizational
and technological approaches to the management of waste containing
14C and tritium. This report also reviews different sources of waste containing
14C andtritium and their characteristics important in the selection of appropriate
methods for the processing, storage, disposal and release of this type of waste.
It is also intended by the publication of this report to update the information on
the management of tritium contaminated waste published by the IAEA in 1981
in Technical Reports Series No. 203, Handling of Tritium-Bearing Wastes, and,
in 1991, in Technical Reports Series No. 324, Safe Handling of Tritium: Review
of Data and Experience.
This report was prepared by experts from five countries through a series
of Consultants Meetings. The IAEA officer responsible for the preparation of
this report was V. Efremenkov of the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and
Waste Technology. The IAEA is grateful to all experts who contributed to the
preparation of this report”

Oh good, nothing could possibly go wrong then. Could it? They say they have it all under control. Do they?

http://rt.com/news/fukushima-high-radioactivity-well-335/

“Radioactivity level spikes 6,500 times at Fukushima well”

“Radioactivity levels in a well near a storage tank at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan have risen immensely on Thursday, the plant’s operator has reported.

Officials of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said on Friday they detected 400,000 becquerels per liter of beta ray-emitting radioactive substances – including strontium – at the site, a level 6,500 times higher than readings taken on Wednesday, NHK World reported.

The storage tank leaked over 300 tons of contaminated water in August, some of which is believed to have found its way into the sea through a ditch.

The well in question is about 10 meters from the tank and was dug to gauge leakage.

TEPCO said the findings show that radioactive substances like strontium have reached the groundwater. High levels of tritium, which transfers much easier in water than strontium, had already been detected.”

Guess what? The nukers are actually out of control.

How’s it going Lake Barrett? According to plan? Minimise the consequences, deny victims exist or will exist and pump the shit to sea? How are you going to clean up Japan sir?

Let the place evaporate? How many hundreds of tons of crap is that?

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-13/us-nuclear-expert-27not-concerned27-by-fukushima-site/4957752

US nuclear expert Lake Barrett ‘not concerned’ by Fukushima radioactive leaks
PM
By North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy, wires

Updated Sat 14 Sep 2013, 9:25am AEST

Everyone employed and paid by nuclear industry is apparently “unconcerned” about the gross failure of nuclear technology and the breach of promise given to the world by nuclear experts at public hearings in the USA in the 1970s specifically focused on the equipment allowed by the USA to be deployed, under USA terms of placement and design, at Fukushima.

This is a failure first of US nuclear technology. Everything else, including the ludicrous and inhumane backtracking of Dr Yamashita and the involved of Fumushima Medical University, according to the reading of nuclear medical history regarding the latent period and rate of growth of thyroid cancer in children affected by nuclear disasters in two nations.

How many kids are now involved in this patently obvious medical deception?

It is just the same deception as suffered in the 1950s by nuclear veterans and downwinders. It is exactly the same. And NO rampant radio chemist in Sweden or anywhere else is able to convince me otherwise.

http://www.nevadadesertexperience.org/issues/consequences.htm

” While scientific study and understanding of the affects of radiation fallout pre-date any testing [as far back as 1939 government employed scientists wrote that radiation fallout was sure consequence of nuclear detonation], but the American public has been pacified for generations with incomplete information. A clear example of this is that while the government claimed that there were no ill effects of radiation, they delayed testing on days when the wind was blowing toward Los Angeles or San Francisco.

Cancer rates and incidence of birth defects are greatly increased in areas exposed in the radiation fallout. According to the National Cancer Institute, exposure to radiation during the atmospheric testing era resulted in an estimated 120,000 extra cases of thyroid cancer and 6,000 deaths.

Nevada Desert Experience is one of many organizations working for nuclear transparency and fallout victim justice….

Utah cancer survivor says Atomic Testing Museum ignores the plight of downwinders
By Christopher Smart
The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake Tribune

LAS VEGAS – When Michelle Thomas was growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, her mother tacked up a hand-drawn map of their St. George neighborhood. She would mark an “X” for every house where someone had cancer.

That diagram – filled with dozens of X’s – isn’t on display at the newly opened Atomic Testing Museum on Las Vegas’ storied Flamingo Road. But that isn’t what angers Thomas. “It’s like we didn’t even exist,” says the lifelong St. George resident. “As a downwinder, that’s deeply offensive.”

Aided by a wheelchair last week, Thomas toured the new 8,000-square-foot facility that highlights the development of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas.
She sees the museum as a monument to the bomb with little attention to its price in human lives. “In a word,” she says, “propaganda.”

Thomas can walk with a cane, but her polymyositis – the degenerative autoimmune disorder she has endured for the past 30 years – makes it difficult. Born in 1952, just after the onset of above-ground nuclear testing, she also has suffered from ovarian cysts, breast cancer and a benign salivary gland tumor.

The $4.5 million museum – built with public and private funds, including handsome donations from defense contractors Bechtel and Lockheed Martin – harks to the final days of World War II and the dawn of the Cold War. The Defense Department, called War Department during World War II, and the Atomic Energy Commission were racing to develop the atomic bomb to defeat the Japanese and, later, the hydrogen bomb to stave off the Soviets.

The museum is replete with technological and cultural timelines that encompass both the forward march of nuclear arms capability as well as pop icons like Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley. It features mock civilian bomb shelters as well as other signs of the times, like women sporting atomic hairdos.
Thomas groans upon spying a life-size cutout of a nude Miss Atomic Bomb, a beauty pageant winner whose private parts are covered by a mushroom cloud.

“That’s ironic,” she smirks. “We’ve all had cancer of the ovaries and breasts.” But while the museum and its gift shop boast kitschy trinkets, the bulk of the exhibition is serious and sobering. “The purpose of the museum is to capture the history of the Nevada Test Site and nuclear testing in general,” explains curator Bill Johnson. Exhibits emphasize the huge national undertaking that was the arms race. “If there is a message,” Johnson says, “it is that the Cold War really was a war.”

But people in southwestern Utah’s Washington County and thousands of other downwinders were unwilling participants, “guinea pigs” who were lied to about the effects of radioactive fallout, Thomas says. “We are veterans of the Cold War. But we didn’t sign up,” she says. “We were always told the government was very interested in our health. We thought, ‘Oh, aren’t we lucky.’ ”

Federal officials tested St. George schoolchildren’s thyroids twice a year, Thomas recalls, and sometimes recommended the gland be removed. During bomb tests, residents were advised to stay indoors. “It was like, ‘Go inside and watch “I Love Lucy” for a couple of hours and everything will be fine.’ ”

At the Las Vegas museum, visitors get a glimpse of the violence in an above-ground nuclear test in a small auditorium. After a countdown, benches vibrate as the screen shows a roiling nuclear explosion. Blasts from air cannons mimic the shock wave.

Al O’Donnell, an 82-year-old museum docent who worked at the test site for all 100 above-ground explosions between 1951 and 1968, says the blasts were vital to America’s security.
“What I did, I did to protect the liberty of the United States,” he says during a 10-minute video. “I’d do it all over again.”

As the auditorium lights go up, Thomas struggles to hold back tears and tells O’Donnell, who is standing nearby, that she paid a price for the testing. “I’ve been walking with a cane all my life and my friends are dead. I don’t have the freedom you talked about.”

In an emotional exchange, O’Donnell tells Thomas he is sorry for the pain and suffering that came out of the tests. He also concedes that many of his colleagues died from the radiation. “I’m afraid to go up to St. George,” he says. “I’m afraid they’d stone me to death.”

Dina Titus, a professor of political science at University of Nevada-Las Vegas, also makes an appearance on the bomb-test video, noting that downwinders indeed were misled by the government. Her two-minute monologue is among the examples that curator Johnson and others point to as attempts to include downwinders in the museum.

In an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune, Titus, who criticizes the weapons program in her 1986 book Bombs in Our Backyard, explains that at the onset of the testing, southern Utah residents backed the program, portrayed to them as vital to the nation’s security.

“Not only were they harmed, but they were lied to by the people who said they would protect them,” Titus says. “It was like a double whammy.” A downwinders exhibit should be added, Titus says. The price they paid was too high. “It wasn’t worth it, to put people at risk like that.” The museum’s most important function, Titus adds, is that it houses all the records from the 928 tests at the Nevada site (828 below ground) between 1951 and 1992. Among those documents is government evidence dating to the late ’40s and early ’50s that fallout is hazardous.

Despite such knowledge, the downwinders’ battle for recognition and compensation took almost 40 years. After meeting 27-year-old Connie Selzer, of Washington, D.C., during the tour, Thomas worries that many museum patrons will walk away with little or no knowledge of downwinders.
“It’s a whole side of the story I didn’t know about,” Selzer says after chatting with Thomas. “It’s like not knowing about the Holocaust.”

Near the tour’s end, Thomas looks quizzically at an exhibit that includes a chunk of 9-11 World Trade Center wreckage. The Cold War and the creation of the nuclear weapons were fueled by fear and hate, she says. “This is a reminder to be afraid.” Talk of resuming nuclear testing – including from Utah Congressman Chris Cannon – baffles Thomas. “It’s like going back 50 years when they came to town and said, ‘Don’t be afraid,’ ” she says. “For them to say that now is serious crazy-making.”
csmart@sltrib.com ”

Nothing ever changes for nuclear victims. Their governments uniformly say they don’t exist. But ordinary people around the globe, more and more of us, know otherwise. How stupid does government and the industrial puppet masters think we are?

From September 1945, when Groves claimed that the reports of radiation sickness in the nuked cities of Japan were “enemy propaganda” to the assurances of Edward Teller that noone was harmed by nuclear testing, to Ronald Reagan claiming people who wanted all nuclear testing ended were “communists” to the British and Australian governments claiming their bombs were “safe” to the new nuclear museum in Nevada continuing the myth of fallout safety by denying, by exclusion, that nuclear victims in the USA exist to Lake Barrett, formerly of DOE USA and now talking head for TEPCO, the song remains the same. All these paid hacks of the nukers claimed and claim that there is nothing to worry about.

Go rip your own thyroid out Mr Barrett and then say that.

In forty years time, people will wander around the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Museum. How many of them will feel like the US Downwinders who wander around the Nuclear Museum in Nevada, angered and perplexed at how a museum dedicated to a disaster could forget to mention its human toll.

The song will remain the same as long as politicians are puppets to the people who have lied since 1939.

The issue is the fallout in the foodchain. The mere facts of history are currently being used to minimise the vast failure of nuclear technology, including disaster mitigation technologies, evidenced at Fukushima. The fact is the historic breaches of promise and infliction of risk on the individuals alive at relevant times do NOT provide a basis for statements optimism. Rather, the historical facts experienced by families who suffered in past times cry out the opposite. The fact is that nuclear victims have always been denied by nuclear authorities.

And that is a fact.

Airborne emissions from Fukushima Diiachi are not mentioned at all these days.

But given the continual need to cool the still heating cores, (which no expert on the planet can fully assess) and given the routine steam emissions from the reactors, and given the visual evidence provided by the TEPCO Live Cam, airborne emissions must surely be occurring still. To some extent or another.

The resuspension of radioactive particles throughout the afflicted region, the laws governing the leaching (movement) of radionuclides, the current state of contamination of freshwater fish in afflicted areas of Japan. All these things show the situation is one in which, at the very least, the people of Japan and the world should care and worry about very much.

Mr Barrett.

Least I can say about your opinion sir is that even the IAEA technical report cited above disagrees with you. And so I take the US DOE doesn’t really give a stuff about anything very much at all, except it’s own bullshit self importance. Certainly not it’s victims.


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