Risk in the USA

From an American friend:

“….As for risk, I’ve been asked that question too. I think the real answer is here:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db88.htm

This is US government data, from the National Vital Statistics Survey.

Look at Figure 1. See that little bump in 1979-80? That’s tens of thousands of people who died in my home state of Pennsylvania and New York, as a result of the disaster at Three Mile Island. I think that’s what the risk is – you and your loved ones dying a little earlier than you otherwise would (just as importantly, in my opinion: being less healthy and less vigorous in the meantime).

It’s an extra-yummy bonus that you’ll have to spend the rest of your life listening to the authorities say that no one was harmed, when you can look at a graph and see that claim is obviously bullshit.”

end quote.

In regard to the earlier 1950s peak, the work of Carl Johnson is very relevant in providing a visualization of the local consequences:

Carl Jean Johnson (July 2, 1929 – December 29, 1988), was a public health physician who opposed nuclear testing.[1]

He was discharged from Army service on March 18, 1949. He went to Michigan State University and the Ohio State University College of Medicine. He had a master’s Degree in public health from the University of California, Berkeley.[1]
[edit] Rocky Flats

In 1976 he was the Director of the Jefferson County, Colorado Department of Health. He reported that soil around the Rocky Flats Plant contained 44 times more plutonium than the government claimed. In 1977 he reported higher-than-average rates of leukemia and cancer among the local people. In 1980 he reported that plant workers had eight times more brain tumors than expected. In 1981 he was fired. He later won a whistleblower lawsuit against Jefferson County, Colorado. In 1985 he lost an election to become the Boulder County, Colorado Director of Health.[1]
[edit] Death and burial

He died on December 29, 1988 at Lutheran Memorial Hospital in Lakewood, Colorado of an unsuspected birth defect of the heart. He was buried in the Fort Logan National Cemetery in Colorado on January 3, 1989.[1][3][4]
[edit] Publications

* Carl J. Johnson, “Funding of Radiation Protection Standards Research”, letter to the editor, American Journal of Public Health, February 1979.
* Carl J. Johnson, “Cancer Incidence in an Area of Radioactive Fallout Downwind from the Nevada Test Site”, Journal of the American Medical Association, Volume 251, Number 2, January 13, 1984.
* Carl J. Johnson, “Rocky Flats: Death Inc.” The New York Times, Op-Ed; Sunday, December 18, 1988, Op-ed E-23.

JAMA. 1984 Jan 13;251(2):230-6.
Cancer incidence in an area of radioactive fallout downwind from the Nevada Test Site.

Johnson CJ.
Abstract

Exposures in southwestern Utah to radioactive fallout (1951 through 1962) from atmospheric nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were followed by smaller exposures (1962 through 1979) from venting of underground nuclear detonations. The cancer incidence in a 1951 cohort (4, 125) of Mormon families in southwestern Utah near the NTS was compared with that of all Utah Mormons (1967 through 1975). There were 109 more cases of cancer than expected (288[observed]/179[expected]). Leukemia was most prominent early (1958 through 1966), with 19 cases, five times more than expected (3.6). The excess of leukemia persisted into the later period (1972 through 1980), with 12 cases observed, 3.4 expected. There was an increase in lymphoma. Excess cases of thyroid cancer appeared early and a notable excess appeared later (14/1.7). An excess of breast cancer was noted later (27/14). There were more cancers of the gastrointestinal tract than expected. There was an excess of melanoma (12/4.5), bone cancer (8/0.7), and brain tumors (9/3.9). A subgroup with history of acute fallout effects had a higher cancer incidence. That these cases can be associated with radiation exposures is supported by a comparison between groups of the ratio of cancers of more radiosensitive organs with all other types of cancer.

PMID: 6690781 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
end quote of abstract.

a full text pdf download of this article is available at:

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/251/2/230

“A burden of
radiation-induced cancer throughout
the state can be expected, because an
excess of childhood leukemia has been
reported for the entire state, and this
observation is an early warning of
other classes of radiation-induced
cancer to appear later.”

‘In the last
five-year period (27 to 32 years after
the bombs), the excess cancer death
rate increased by 2.4 times, caused by
cancer of the esophagus, stomach,
colon, lung, breast, and urinary tract,
lymphoma, and multiple myeloma.2
There was an increase in cancer of the
thyroid gland and benign tumors as
well”

“The incidence of cancer
of the breast was unremarkable in
1958 through 1966 (8/8.8), but a sharp
increase was noted in 1972 through
1980 (27/14.2, P=.01).16″

Johnson is described as a radiation hysteric by the industry and its advocates.

So here’s a graph of basically the same population by Dr Lyon, the dude
employed by authorities to minimize the consequences of fallout in the USA:

Don’t panic Barry.


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