Archive for December, 2013

A new message from Dave Whyte, H bomb veteran

December 31, 2013

Dave Whyte (dave.whyte@blueyonder.co.uk)
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19/12/2013
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Hello Everyone,

I have pleasure in enclosing Fissionline No15, the Christmas Edition.

I have added the following as it may be of interest.

I recently received a copy of the ‘Radiological Safety Regulations’ for Christmas Island dated July 1958 and I believed there were numerous articles that nuclear Veterans would be rather interested , or shocked, if they read them.

As I had already received numerous other documents and was under restriction as to what I could, or could not divulge I decided to request directions on whether or not it was permissible to communicate these interesting articles to other like minded nuclear Veterans as the document did not contain any personal information.

Although I have not received the official judicial direction on this matter, I have received a reply from the Treasury Solicitor informing me that I am not permitted to use the ‘Radiological Safety Regulations’ for any purpose other than the appeal. I wonder what information the TSoL is afraid to let the world know!

It now appears the MoD, AWE and TSoL in addition to being permitted to lose, hide, falsify or forge documents they can now deny the nuclear Veterans their basic right to discover what safety regulations were in force when they were ordered to attend the British nuclear tests.

To all nuclear Veterans, their Families and Supporters I personally wish a ‘Very merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!’

Dave Whyte

PS. Remember to send a copy to your Friends and Member of Parliament.

Tepco puts on a fresh brew

December 30, 2013

From Kaye in Kobe.

paul, have you heard of anything about this??? we don’T know anything… here, no media cover the story on this…. we need info…..

http://www.turnerradionetwork.com/news/146-mjt

Turner Radio Network, Free Speech No matter who doesn’t like it.

(Didnt know Ted went to Flinders U)

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) says radioactive steam has suddenly begun emanating from previously exploded nuclear reactor building #3 at the Fukuishima disaster site in Japan. TEPCO says they do not know why this is happening and cannot go into the building to see what’s happening due to damage and lethal radiation levels in that building. Experts say this could be the beginning of a “spent fuel pool criticality (meltdown)” involving up to 89 TONS of nuclear fuel burning up into the atmosphere and heading to North America. Steam photo, full details and suggested methods to protect yourself appear below.

On December 28, 2013, the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) admitted steam was seen billowing out of reactor building #3, saying the steam appeared to be coming from what’s left of the fifth floor of the mostly-destroyed building. It is widely known that persons cannot get inside Reactor Building #3 because it is severely damaged and highly radioactive, so TEPCO cannot state for certain what is happening in that building or why. TEPCO admits they do not know why this steam is being generated, but matter-of-factly revealed today (December 28) the steam was first spotted on December 19 for a short period of time, then again on December 24 and again on December 25.

Nuclear energy experts have told TRN that the ONLY way this could be happening is if radioactive material previously ejected from the reactor explosion in March, 2011 has mixed together with other materials and has begun its own self-sustaining reaction(s), also known as a “criticality.” Put simply, another “meltdown” may be taking place.

There are basically two possibilities if another meltdown is in progress:

1) Pellets of radioactive fuel, ejected when the reactor exploded, have mixed together and “mini” meltdowns are taking place with those small clumps of pellets. This would not be a horrific problem and may be manageable, OR;

2) Pellets of radioactive fuel, ejected when the reactor exploded, went into the spent fuel pool located above the reactor and have begun melting down so seriously they are boiling off the water in the spent fuel pool.

Since steam is visible, experts tell TRN that Scenario #2 above is is the most likely scenario and if so, it would be an absolute nightmare — WORSE than the original Fukushima disaster! The Spent Fuel Pool was situated on the fourth floor above Reactor #3, and if this is the source of the steam, the situation could escalate rapidly out of control.

There are basically two possibilities if another meltdown is in progress:

1) Pellets of radioactive fuel, ejected when the reactor exploded, have mixed together and “mini” meltdowns are taking place with those small clumps of pellets. This would not be a horrific problem and may be manageable, OR;

2) Pellets of radioactive fuel, ejected when the reactor exploded, went into the spent fuel pool located above the reactor and have begun melting down so seriously they are boiling off the water in the spent fuel pool.

Since steam is visible, experts tell TRN that Scenario #2 above is is the most likely scenario and if so, it would be an absolute nightmare — WORSE than the original Fukushima disaster! The Spent Fuel Pool was situated on the fourth floor above Reactor #3, and if this is the source of the steam, the situation could escalate rapidly out of control.


http://www.turnerradionetwork.com/images/steamreactor%203.jpg

My answer to Kaye in Kobe is this:

https://nuclearhistory.wordpress.com/2013/11/22/the-ergen-report-1967-eccs-meltdown-studies/

So steam is not unexpected when hot corium meets water.

Remember the arguments over using seawater in the Fuk reactors in the early days? It wasnt just about wrecking the reactors. Adding water would increase fission rate. And it did.

Ask your friendly local GE sales person. After all, in March 2011 GE stated that it would “stand by its customers”. That’s the people of Japan and the world. Anyone heard from em lately

I would suspect its corium and water , which is why I think they built the place there – as some sick emergency cooling to minimise the size of the spreading fuel lava. Have passed it on to a nuclear engineering fellow Kaye.

I believe they did not choose that site for no reason. Its implied in the Ergen report that certain situations minimise the size of the molten core. At various costs to the environment of course.

https://nuclearhistory.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/molten-cores-in-dry-sand-ergen-report-via-lapp-71-vs-fukushima-diiachi-wet-ground/

Molten Cores in dry sand : Ergen Report via Lapp, 71 vs Fukushima Diiachi wet ground

Repost of Lapp’s 1971 article, note discussion on page 3 (image 3) of core behavior in dry sand.

Ralph Lapp – Thoughts on Nuclear Plumbing, 1971. Where would you put ‘em now, Ralph?

Ralp Lapp – Unsafe core cooling systems in Reactors, 1971
NEW YORK TIMES 12 DECEMBER 1971

THOUGHTS ON NUCLEAR PLUMBING

keeping the corium as small as possible is their idea of “all A OK, here”. “I’m not worried about Fukushima”: Lake Barrett.

Too bad about the steam and environmental poisoning of land sea air and life. Have a banana.

https://nuclearhistory.wordpress.com/2013/08
/18/hydrology-and-flow-accumulation-near-fukushima-daiichi-pp/

The hydrology of Fukushima has long been known and was probably in my opinion chosen as a source of emergency coolant should the arse drop out of the reactors as predicted by the GE 3 who lost their jobs in t
he 70s.

Steam? ” Oh goodie, time for coffee” Lake Barrett. (not really but he is “not worried”.

Pity noone knows where is the molten cores are.

For 60 years they told us they knew everything. And those who disagreed were communists.

phuck em. Cold shut down. Remember that? Measure the places where the fuel was not and say “hunky dory” or whatever that is in nuke speak.

Water tables, to these idiots, are the core cooling systems of last result. Which is why Lake Barrett is “Not concerned about Fukushima” Typical nuclear crap.
from their point of view keeping the nuclear lava cool is a good thing. Pity about the steam but.

corium behaviour in differing materials:

1. Size of Molten Sphere in Various Soils 1
To illustrate the magnitude of the decay heat release from a 3,200Mwt
core in terms of the heat capacity of several common materials, the
size of a molten sphere containing one-hour-aged fission products was
calculated using dry sand and limestone as the heat absorbing material.
The model for this calculation assumed that the molten material in the
sphere was all at the melting temperature – 3,133 degrees F for dry sand and
4,4600 degrees F for limestone – and had the same density as the surrounding
material so that no settling or floating of the sphere would occur.
Conduction heat transfer from the sphere was included on the basis of
infinite medium surrounding the molten sphere. Fig. 1 shows the sphere
radius as a function of the time after shutdown for dry sand and limestone
as heat sink materials; the sphere radius for the adiabatic – i.e.
no conduction – condition is also shown for dry sand. These results
indicate that molten spheres of approx 60 ft diameter for limestone and
approx 90 ft diameter for dry sand would be required to absorb and dissipate
the decay heat from a 3,200 Mwt core. Also the growth of a molten sphere
would continue for a approx 20,000 hours under these conditions.”

Source: Emergency core cooling : report
Author: W K Ergen; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Advisory Task Force on Power Reactor Emergency Cooling.
Publisher: Oak Ridge, Tenn : USAEC, Division of Technical Information Extension, [1966?]
Edition/Format: Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database: WorldCat
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Subjects

Nuclear reactors — Safety measures.
Nuclear reactors — Cooling.

From the mad nuker view the wetter the better, except that water is a neutron moderator. More water, more fission, more heat, more need for cooling, more nuke lava. The nuclear devil’s balance they do not talk about because they have not got a technical fix. Apart from feeding it to the fish. And People. And insects etc. The biosphere, it was a nice place once.

Then Groves took the apple Szilard offered him.

And said it was perfectly safe and there was no fallout in Japan.

Some people will believe anything.

As you can tell this is all getting so bloody blatant, I’m sick of it. But then, I’m down here in the Bolt Holt. It’ll get here.

Sooner or later.

Unless Barry’s idea of the little plastic bags is correct. Which it isnt. And he knew it when it told that town hall full of school kids.

Didnt you Barry.

I reckon they deliberately placed the joint where it was so that they could in emergency divert the ground water to the reactor basements to aid cooling.

Prove me wrong Barry Brooks. Smart arse.

The qualifications of Toshihide Tsuda, Okayama University VS. FMU

December 29, 2013

This post is in progress and is incomplete. Professor Toshihide Tsuda has been attacked by Fukushima Medical University for his findings relating to the increase of thyroid cancer in children and teenagers of Fukushima. Fukushima Medical University has been quoted by quoted in Japanese press as stating that Tsuda’s findings were “not appropriate in scientific terms” (Source: THE ASAHI SHIMBUN, 22 Dec 2013, http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201312220021 The pages of my blog contain a number of international papers, many pre dating March 2011, which contradict the position of Fukushima Medical University regarding the latent period of thyroid cancer, and these will be republished at the end of this post. Marston in Australia was called unscientific and a communist. Communism as a label is a bit old hat, however the agenda of attacking by decree has not changed. Such attacks against independent researchers have a long history. In Australia the attacks upon Dr Marston in the 1950s by the nuclear establishment and government secret intelligence service, were vicious. It took 30 years for these agencies and paid agents to be revealed for what they were due to evidence given in the Royal Commission of the 1980s. Is Prof Tsuda one of Japan’s “Dr Marstons”? Has the nuclear industry changed its behavior? I believe not. http://soran.cc.okayama-u.ac.jp/view?l=en&u=7ba63c045f7c130374506e4da22f6611&n=%E6%B4%A5%E7%94%B0&sm=name&sl=ja&sp=1 Epidemiological theory, environmental epidemiology: Toshihide Tsuda Professor of Environmental Epidemiology Department of Human Ecology, Okayama University Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science Name TSUDA Toshihide Affiliation Graduate School of Environmental and life Science Title Professor Sex male Web Site http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/user/envepi/ Research areas, keyword Epidemiology, Environmental Medicine, Causal Inference, Evidence Based Medicine Research Subject 【 display / non-display 】 Subject:Outbreak Epidemiology http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/user/envepi/en/lab.html Thank you for visiting the website of Tsuda and Yorifuji’s research office of Department of Human Ecology at Okayama University Graduate School of Environmental and Life Scienc. Our specialty is epidemiology. We conduct epidemiological studies mainly on environmental and perinatal health. By using epidemiological methods, we attempt to quantitatively evaluate the causal relation in these fields. Mission Our mission is to advance the public health among people in Japan, Asia, and the world. To pursue this mission, we attempt to provide evidence from epidemiologic studies mainly focusing on environmental and perinatal health problems (in the past as well as in the present). Objectives Our objectives are: To provide evidence from Asia to the world to improve health for people of all nations To strengthen the network between researchers in Asia and foster human resource development as well as researches in Asia To advance the public health among people in Japan, Asia, and the world Tsuda and Yorifuji’s Research Office Department of Human Ecology, Okayama University Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science 3-1-1 Tsushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama, 700-8530, Japan 大学Map Copyright Okayama University Some Publications of Toshihide Tsuda (source: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Toshihide_Tsuda/publications/ Article: A counterfactual approach to bias and effect modification in terms of response types. Etsuji Suzuki, Toshiharu Mitsuhashi, Toshihide Tsuda, Eiji Yamamoto [show abstract] BMC Medical Research Methodology 07/2013; 13(1):101. · 2.21 Impact Factor Article: Regional impact of exposure to a polychlorinated biphenyl and polychlorinated dibenzofuran mixture from contaminated rice oil on stillbirth rate and secondary sex ratio. Takashi Yorifuji, Saori Kashima, Akiko Tokinobu, Tsuguhiko Kato, Toshihide Tsuda [show abstract] Environment international 06/2013; 59C:12-15. · 4.79 Impact Factor Source Dataset: Ibrahim et al., J. Trop Pediatr 2011 Indonesia antenatal care Juliani Ibrahim, Toshihide Tsuda, Takashi Yorifuji, Saori Kashima, Hiroyuki Doi Article: Critical appraisal of the 1977 diagnostic criteria for minamata disease. Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Sachiko Inoue, Soshi Takao, Masazumi Harada, Ichiro Kawachi [show abstract] Archives of Environmental and Occupational Health 01/2013; 68(1):22-9. · 1.19 Impact Factor Article: Study on the factors determining home death of patients during home care: A historical cohort study at a home care support clinic. Seiji Kawagoe, Toshihide Tsuda, Hiroyuki Doi [show abstract] Geriatrics & Gerontology International 12/2012; Article: Long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and the risk of death from hemorrhagic stroke and lung cancer in Shizuoka, Japan. Takashi Yorifuji, Saori Kashima, Toshihide Tsuda, Kazuko Ishikawa-Takata, Toshiki Ohta, Ken-Ichi Tsuruta, Hiroyuki Doi [show abstract] Science of The Total Environment 11/2012; 443C:397-402. · 3.26 Impact Factor Article: Asian dust and daily all-cause or cause-specific mortality in western Japan. Saori Kashima, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Akira Eboshida [show abstract] Occupational and environmental medicine 10/2012; · 3.64 Impact Factor Article: On the relations between excess fraction, attributable fraction, and etiologic fraction. Etsuji Suzuki, Eiji Yamamoto, Toshihide Tsuda [show abstract] American journal of epidemiology 02/2012; 175(6):567-75. · 5.59 Impact Factor Article: Short-term effect of severe exposure to methylmercury on atherosclerotic heart disease and hypertension mortality in Minamata. Sachiko Inoue, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Hiroyuki Doi [show abstract] Science of The Total Environment 02/2012; 417-418:291-3. · 3.26 Impact Factor Source Article: Does open-air exposure to volatile organic compounds near a plastic recycling factory cause health effects? Takashi Yorifuji, Miyuki Noguchi, Toshihide Tsuda, Etsuji Suzuki, Soshi Takao, Saori Kashima, Yukio Yanagisawa [show abstract] Journal of Occupational Health 01/2012; 54(2):79-87. · 1.63 Impact Factor Source Article: Methyl mercury exposure at Niigata, Japan: results of neurological examinations of 103 adults. Kimio Maruyama, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Tomoko Sekikawa, Hiroto Nakadaira, Hisashi Saito [show abstract] BioMed Research International 01/2012; 2012:635075. · 2.88 Impact Factor Article: Residential proximity to major roads and placenta/birth weight ratio. Takashi Yorifuji, Hiroo Naruse, Saori Kashima, Takeshi Murakoshi, Toshihide Tsuda, Hiroyuki Doi, Ichiro Kawachi [show abstract] Science of The Total Environment 12/2011; 414:98-102. · 3.26 Impact Factor Article: Frequency of antenatal care visits and neonatal mortality in Indonesia. Juliani Ibrahim, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Saori Kashima, Hiroyuki Doi [show abstract] Journal of Tropical Pediatrics 09/2011; 58(3):184-8. · 1.01 Impact Factor Article: An epidemiological study of children with status epilepticus in Okayama, Japan: incidence, etiologies, and outcomes. Itsuko Nishiyama, Yoko Ohtsuka, Toshihide Tsuda, Katsuhiro Kobayashi, Hideo Inoue, Koji Narahara, Hiroshi Shiraga, Takafumi Kimura, Makoto Ogawa, Tomoyuki Terasaki, Hiromichi Ono, Tsutomu Takata [show abstract] Epilepsy research 07/2011; 96(1-2):89-95. · 2.48 Impact Factor Source Article: Influence of radiofrequency ablation of lung cancer on pulmonary function. Akihiro Tada, Takao Hiraki, Toshihiro Iguchi, Hideo Gobara, Hidefumi Mimura, Shinichi Toyooka, Katsuyuki Kiura, Toshihide Tsuda, Toshiharu Mitsuhashi, Susumu Kanazawa [show abstract] CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 07/2011; 35(4):860-7. · 2.09 Impact Factor Source Article: Environmental health research implications of methylmercury. Toshihide Tsuda, Takashi Yorifuji, Masazumi Harada Environmental Health Perspectives 07/2011; 119(7):A284; author reply A284-5. · 7.26 Impact Factor Article: Acute non-cancer mortality excess after polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzofurans mixed exposure from contaminated rice oil: Yusho. Saori Kashima, Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda [show abstract] Science of The Total Environment 06/2011; 409(18):3288-94. · 3.26 Impact Factor Source Article: Outbreak of Salmonella Braenderup infection originating in boxed lunches in Japan in 2008. Yoshinori Mizoguchi, Etsuji Suzuki, Hiroaki Tsuchida, Toshihide Tsuda, Eiji Yamamoto, Katsumi Nakase, Hiroyuki Doi [show abstract] Acta medica Okayama 04/2011; 65(2):63-9. · 0.65 Impact Factor Article: Environmental factors and seasonal influenza onset in Okayama city, Japan: case-crossover study. Yuuki Tsuchihashi, Takashi Yorifuji, Soshi Takao, Etsuji Suzuki, Shigeru Mori, Hiroyuki Doi, Toshihide Tsuda [show abstract] Acta medica Okayama 04/2011; 65(2):97-103. · 0.65 Impact Factor Source Article: Long-term exposure to methylmercury and psychiatric symptoms in residents of Minamata, Japan. Takashi Yorifuji, Toshihide Tsuda, Sachiko Inoue, Soshi Takao, Masazumi Harada [show abstract] Environment international 04/2011; 37(5):907-13. · 4.79 Impact Factor It would be a fool with an unscientific agenda who would call the above author unscientific in my opinion. Further, on the contrary, the peer reviewed papers predating March 2011 cited by Fukushima Medical University as proof of the unscientific nature of scientists who present findings contrary to the official Japanese government and nuclear industry medical decrees are very numerous. For many years Japan did not have a national cancer registry, Osaka being one of the few. The cancer registry of Japan was until the early 21st century of the same standard of that of Brazil and Iran in the early days after the revolution. That is, individual hospital kept records and researchers had to access each one. Even so, in the 1990s many medical scientists raised concern in peer reviewed papers at the rapid increase childhood thyroid cancer in Japan which occurred from the 1980s and did not diminish until the 1990s, albeit at a higher level that seen prior to the 1970s. eg. Baba et al. Dr Yamashita, previous head of the post Fukushima childhood cancer monitoring project, conducted in association with Fukushima Medical University, stated clearly and bluntly that the latent period for thyroid cancer post exposure was not less than four years. This is echoed by the current statements of Fukushima Medical University. Hence its attack, I think, on any scientist who presents contradictory findings. While condemning as unscientific any scientists who uses cancer data, is it scientific for Fukushima Medical University to merely issue decrees? No. In fact Yamashita and FMU contradict papers written pre 2011 by Yamashita et al which record very rapid onset (short latent period) in childhood and early adult thyroid cancer. Yet to justify their post 2011 statements they cite “Chernobyl paper” which they purport prove a uniform long latent period for the disease of at least 4 years minimum prior to disease onset. A readiing of pre 2011 Yamashita et al and many other papers show this decree by Yamashita and FMU TO BE FALSE and unscientific. Marston in Australia in the 1950s had his mail opened by Australian and British intelligence services, on the basis that his work proved the nuclear industry at that time to be incorrect, politically motivated and unscientific. Is the same or similar happening today in Japan? Why not? What has changed except the date? THE ASAHI SHIMBUN article in full (see link above) government at which experts offered their opinions. Tsuda used the results of cancer registration statistics kept in Japan to support his theory. Those statistics showed that between 1975 and 2008, an estimated annual average of between five to 11 people in their late teens to early 20s developed thyroid cancer for every 1 million people. “Because there is the possibility that the number of cases could increase in the future, there is a need to implement measures now,” he said. However, Tetsuya Ohira, a professor of epidemiology at Fukushima Medical University, criticized Tsuda’s conclusion saying it was not appropriate in scientific terms to compare the results of the testing in Fukushima with cancer registry statistics. Fukushima prefectural government officials plan to look further into the relationship between radiation exposure and thyroid cancer after analyzing future test results. Thyroid cancer screening is being conducted on young people in Fukushima Prefecture who were 18 or younger at the time of the nuclear accident, which was triggered by the March 11, 2011, Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami. As of Sept. 30, 2013, 59 out of about 239,000 tested had been diagnosed with or are suspected of having thyroid cancer. One was diagnosed with a benign tumor. Shinichi Suzuki, a Fukushima Medical University professor involved in the tests, said there was no link between the effects of radiation exposure and the cases of diagnosed or suspected thyroid cancer. (This article was written by Teruhiko Nose and Yuri Oiwa.) Some peer reviewed qualified papers which utilize cancer data in a scientific manner are as follows. Such papers would, on the dictates of Fukushima Medical University, be considered “scientifically inappropriate” in the opinion of that August body. Because the scientific method used runs counter, apparently, the the method used by FMU. That is, say what is politically appropriate and damn the actual observations. If they run counter to the opinions already held by the Japanese government, GE, Tepco, Westinghouse, GE, Bechtel and the Yakuza. Social engineering is indeed a science, but it is NOT MEDICINE. Incidence and survival trends for childhood cancer in Osaka, Japan, 1973–2001 Sachiko Baba, 1,2 Akiko Ioka, 3 Hideaki Tsukuma, 3 Hiroyuki Noda,1,4 Wakiko Ajiki 5 and Hiroyasu Iso1,6 1 Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, and 2 Center for International Relations, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka; 3 Department of Cancer Control and Statistics, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan; 4 Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; 5 Cancer Information Services and Surveillance Division, Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan (Received June 26, 2009 Revised October 31, 2009 Accepted November 6, 2009 Online publication February 2, 2010) Cancer Science Volume 101, Issue 3, pages 787–792, March 2010 © 2010 Japanese Cancer Association Full text download available as link on page at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-7006.2009.01443.x/abstract The following extracts from the above source are reproduced here for study purposes and to alert interested parties of the findings of Baba et. al regarding the state of nation wide cancer reporting and recording in Japan prior to March 2011. The findings of Baba et al regarding the incidence of childhood cancer in Japan are noteworthy. Does the lack of mandatory reporting of cancer diagnosis, such as existed in Japan from end of Occupation and certainly since pre March 2011 presage future uncertainty regarding the impact of nuclear industry emissions in Japan upon the health of the children of Japan? Are the well known studies of a select and narrow portion of the Japanese Adult population by the Atomic Bomb Casulaty Commission and its successor organisation sufficient to define the actual parameters regarding childhood cancer in post war Japan? Does the existence of such a narrow and specific study preclude the need for mandatory reporting of the diagnosis of childhood cancers to central regristries throughout Japan? What is the current and past incidence of children cancer in Japan? Have there been changes in the rate of incidence of childhood cancer in Japan? What are the causes of any changes in the rate of childhood cancer incidence in Japan? Since 1945 the world has watched as a selected group of Atomic Bomb survivors has been intensively studied. What has happened to the children of Japan since 1945? Does anyone really know? Quote “In Japan there is no nationwide cancer registry, although a large population is needed to monitor childhood trends of cancer. The Osaka Cancer Registry is one of the few registries in the world that has a long history and covers a large-enough population to monitor trends of childhood cancer. Ajiki et al. described incidence trends for childhood cancer based on 12 major cancer classifications from 1971 to 1988 by using data from the Osaka Cancer Registry.” end quote. Quote: “This article reports incidence trends for childhood cancer in Osaka from 1973 to 2001 and survival trends from 1978 to 1997 to clarify whether the continuous decline in cancer mortality between 1973 and 2001 was caused by trends for incidence, survival, or both. ” end quote. Quote from the Abstract of the paper with emphais added: “The age-standardized annual incidence rate of all tumors was highest in 1988–1992: 155.1 per million for males and 135.9 for females. Five-year survival for all tumors improved from 50.1% in 1978–1982 to 73.0% in 1993–1997 for males and from 52.3% to 76.3% for females. Thus, the constant decline in mortality in childhood cancer was primarily due to improved survival between the 1970s and 1980s and reduced incidence after the 1990s.” Quote: “The Osaka Cancer Registry gathers information from reports from (1) medical institutions in Osaka Prefecture; (2) death records of inhabitants of Osaka Prefecture mentioning neoplasms; (3) autopsy records of medical institutions in Osaka Prefecture (originally compiled in the Autopsy Records of the Japanese Society of Pathology); (4) information on cancer cases in Osaka Prefecture extracted from the Nationwide Registry of Childhood Cancer of the Society for Protection of Children with Cancer; (5) records of cancer patients in Osaka Prefecture extracted from the Childhood Cancer Registry of the Committee for Malignant Tumors of the Japanese Society for Pediatric Surgeons; and (6) information from application forms used in the Research Project for Pediatric Chronic Severe Diseases.” end quote. The sources of the data are complex. The data is complied. The data is limited to the area defined by the authors. The authors present the findings as they pertain to Osaka only. Quote “Analyses for incidence are based on 5960 cases diagnosed between 1973 and 2001.” end quote. The sample is time limited, apparently, by the availability of the source data. Quote with emphasis added “The data presented here from the large-scale and long-term cancer : in Osaka showed a unique trend in the incidence of total childhood cancer: an increase until 1988 with an APC of 1.5% for males and until 1992 with an APC of 1.7% for females, and then successive decrease with declining APCs of 2.0% for males and 1.9% for females. These trends did not change whenneuroblastomas were excluded from this analysis…..” end quote. Quote: “The reason why the total childhood incidence in Osaka increased but has declined since 1998 for males and 1992 for females is unknown. That decline is unlikely due to a systematic drift for collecting data….” end quote. Quote with emphasis added: “However, the incidence of leukemia, retinoblastoma, central nervous system in males, and hepatic tumors in females did not decline over time, while other tumors such as sympathetic nervous system tumors and germ-cell tumors declined from the middle of the study period for both sexes, a tendency which is not seen in other areas such as the USA and Europe.” end quote. Quote: “The survival of childhood cancer patients in the leukemia and other diagnostic groups in Osaka markedly improved between 1978 and 1992, probably due to earlier diagnosis and more effec- tive therapies.(3,18) The introduction of mass screening for neuroblastomas had no effect on the total tumor survival rates, since the rates excluding and including neuroblastomas were similar…This study was supported in part by a Grant-in Aid for Cancer Research (14-2) from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. Authors appreciate Ms Miho Imanaka for her assistance with making graphs.” end quote. B. Childhood cancer in Japan: focusing on trend in mortality from 1970 to 2006 L. Yang1, J. Fujimoto2, D. Qiu1 and N. Sakamoto1,* + Author Affiliations 1Department of Maternal and Child Health, National Research Institute for Health and Development 2National Research Institute for Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan *Correspondence to: Dr N. Sakamoto, The Division of Epidemiology, Department of Maternal and Child Health, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, 2-10-1 Ookura, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan. Tel: +81-03-3416-0181(4360); Fax: +81-03-5494-7490 source link/ full text download link: http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/content/20/1/166.full Quote: ” A population-based study in Osaka prefecture in Japan indicated that death due to childhood cancer declined from 1972 to 1995, while the incidence increased in the same period [1]. In the United States, an estimated 10 400 new cases and 1545 deaths are expected to occur among children aged 0–14 years in 2007 [2]. During recent three decades, the incidence of childhood cancer increased ∼0.6% annually. In contrast, mortality from childhood cancer declined by 1.3% per year during 1990–2004 [3]. A population-based study among European children since the 1970s showed that the overall incidence of childhood cancer has increased by 1.0% per year, while mortality has declined by 3.6% per year in the past three decades” end quote. Quote “There is no national childhood cancer registry system in Japan, and recent childhood cancer mortality has not been well characterized in terms of temporal and geographic trends. This paper describes the occurrence of death from childhood cancer at the population level over a 37-year period in Japan using official death certification data, which record 100% of deaths in Japan. The aim of this study was to ascertain the general mortality trend for each sex and to study the moment at which a shift in the trend occurred.” Conclusions: In March 2011 the South Australian Minister for Mines announced that noone would die from the Fukushima disaster. A cursory study of two papers which address, in part, the deaths from cancers which are accepted by compentant authorities to have a radiogenic component shows that: 1. In general Japanese researchers not the lack of national registry of childhood cancers. 2. Surveys of the incidence of these cancers result from local area compilations of data, including death certificates. Other authors have been rebuked for using death certifications in this manner. IE. Dr Carl Johnson, in the matter of his reporting increases of incidence of childhood cancers in high fallout counties of Nevada and Utah in the 1950s. As in the case of the Japanese researchers, Dr Johnson had no choice due to the lack of specific data held by relevant authorities. 3. In Japan, variations in the rate of increase in the incidence of childhood cancers have been found. The reasons for these changes are unknown. 4. From the evidence presented, the creation of a uniform national and local data set which would enable comparsion in the incidence of childhood cancer before and after the events of March 2011 at the Fukushima Nuclear Powerplant will be a complex task. 5. On the basis of the historical record, nuclear authorities will resist independent cancer surveys in the current era. The authorities will support only their conclusions which will suffer the same difficulties in data collection as noted by researchers who have published relevant papers prior to March 2011. 6. Cancer reporting is inadequate in Japan nationally, with some local exceptions. This has been the case apparently since the recommencement of governmental independence from Occupation in 1952. The South Australian Minister for Mines in 2011 had and has no basis for his statements pertaining to changes in the incidence of death and disease resultant from the Fukushima nuclear disaster. When the South Australian Minister of Mines makes statements, he bears the responsiblity of being able to show proof. As the matter stands at present, and has been known for many years, regarding the matter of incidence of radiogenic childhood cancers in Japan, the basis of any proof, one way or the other, is very poor. The proof that does exist does not support the position held by the then Minister of Mines and expressed by him as fact in March 2011. The matter will not actually be resolved for some decades. And even then, controversy will persist. The design and establishment of cancer reporting regimes are concious decisions made by government. In 1952 the Japanese government made its decision regarding this matter. As a result, researchers in the 1990s consistently reported on the lack of coherent data, the lack of mandatory reporting and the difficulties which resulted in reporting on the incidence of childhood cancer in Japan. Since that time the Japanese government did not reconsider its position. Why is this so? By what advise has the Japanese government believed, since 1952, that a central cancer registry was not needed in Japan? A limited registry pertaining to a limited population has been established in regard to the Fukushima nuclear emissions disaster. Does this foresage a process of exclusion similar to that embodied in the original pursuits of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission in 1945? Concurrent with the period of time covered by the childhood cancer surveys cited above, the Japanese government proceeded with the construction of nuclear power plant and fuel reprocessing plants throughout Japan. Today the children of Japan are surrounded by over 50 nuclear power plants. The increasing influence of Japan’s nuclear industry has been noted and reported by the Japanese Diet committees since March 2011. It is not known how the changes in the Japanese nuclear industry in the period from the 1970s to the current time has affected the incidence of disease among children in Japan. The current reactor deployment in Japan is visualised in the following graphic: Source: Scientific American. http://www.scientificamerican.com/gallery_directory.cfm?photo_id=C524E617-BCFD-9891-2C248AA0C83655F9 In March, 2011, the Japanese government has decided to set up the first national database center for childhood cancers using a cloud computing system at Chiba Cancer Center. This could be linked to the children’s cancer database in other countries in the near future. Despite the above facts, the government of Japan did not act to establish any sort of central cancer registry system until March 2011 as the following source reveals: http://siop-asia.com/en/news-letters/12-database-system-launched-in-japan.html Source: The Asian Society for Paediatric Oncology. Quote: “The aim of this cloud computing database for childhood cancers: To make a novel ICT system for a long term follow-up of survivors to improve QOL seamlessly from child to adult. To make an inter-hospital network of the children’s cancer database which can be used for 100 years. To make a children’s cancers database utilized for clinical and basic researches, and even for registration.” PITY THE FUKUSHIMA MEDICAL UNIVERSITY AND DR YAMASHITA CONSIDER SUCH WORK AS THE ABOVE “SCIENTIFICALLY INAPPROPRIATE”. The emissions from the Japanese nuclear industry have been characterised and reported upon for many years. eg “Concentration factors for Cs-137 in marine algae from Japanese coastal waters.”, Tateda Y, Koyanagi T.Abiko Research Laboratory, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Chiba, Japan. This paper establishes that radiologic emissions have continuous occurred from the studied nuclear fuel reprocessing plant for years. It is one of many such sources of these emissions in Japan. Ever since the nuclear disaster hit Japan, Dr Yamashita and his trainees at Fukushima Medical University have claimed that the minimum latent period for thyroid cancer in children and young adults was 4 years or more. Without citing actual sources, these “experts” claimed the Chernobyl experience proved this fact via international research. But they did not ever mention any peer reviewed qualified papers upon which they based their edict. For example: ” http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1774837/Thyroid-cancer-hits-Fukushima Thyroid cancer hits Fukushima 5 Jun 2013, 12:57 pm – Source: AAP Nine more young people have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer since Japan’s worst nuclear accident two years ago, according to reports. Nine more young people have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer since Japan’s worst nuclear accident two years ago. That has brought the total number of cancer cases to 12 residents, who were 18 or younger at the time of the meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the Kyodo News agency reported on Wednesday, citing unnamed sources. Fifteen others were also suspected of suffering from some form of cancer, up from seven in a February report, Kyodo said. But experts at Fukushima Medical University said that it is too early to link the cancer cases to the nuclear disaster. They said the 1986 Chernobyl accident showed that it takes at least four to five years before thyroid cancer is detected. Local government officials surveyed about 174,000 young people near the plant in Fukushima. “Fukushima’s survey examines people who have no symptoms across the board and it is hard to evaluate it because there are no comparable data,” an unnamed Environment Ministry official was quoted as saying. “We need to take a careful look at it.” The Fukushima plant suffered meltdowns at three of its six reactors after it was struck by an earthquake and tsunami. More than 150,000 residents have been forced to leave their homes around the complex due to radioactive contamination. end quote What sources are they supposedly quoting? Yamashita for one, the original head of the Fukushima children’s thyroid health monitoring project has written papers on thyroid cancer suffered in Belarus following the Chernobyl disaster. What did he find in his over 100 visits there in relation to the supposed written in stone 4 year minimum latent period for the diseases? First, here’s some peer reviewed papers by qualified researchers with no axe to grind about Fukushima. Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1356259/ Journal List Ann Surg v.239(4); Apr 2004 PMC1356259 Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California. “Latency Period of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Tumors Although some sporadic tumors unrelated to radiation may be included among our patients, the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively (Fig. 1).” end quote. Please read full paper at the above link. Obviously such a paper is deemed inappropriate in science (unscientific) by Fukushima Medical University who stated this : Japanese nuclear “authorities” claim that childhood thyroid cancer caused by radiation exposure takes FIVE YEARS to occur. (latency five years). Where do they get this totally wrong idea from and is it a self serving statement in the legal sense? For instance: “But experts at Fukushima Medical University said that it is too early to link the cancer cases to the nuclear disaster. They said the 1986 Chernobyl accident showed that it takes at least four to five years before thyroid cancer is detected.” AAP, as reported by SBS TV Australia. “Conclusion by Pr. Suzuki of the infamous Fukushima Medical University; “not related to the nuclear accident. It took 5 yrs in Chernobyl to see an increase in thyroid cancers”” Statement reported by Nelson Surjon of Tokyo, Japan. What did the Chernobyl Accident show in this regard? http://www.fhcrc.org/en/news/releases/2004/08/chernobyl.html Study Reveals First Direct Evidence that Risk of Thyroid Cancer After Chernobyl Rises with Increasing Radiation Dose SEATTLE — Sep. 1, 2004 — The risk of thyroid cancer rises with increasing radiation dose, according to the most thorough risk analysis for thyroid cancer to date among people who grew up in the shadow of the 1986 Chernobyl power-plant disaster. The incidence of thyroid cancer was 45 times greater among those who received the highest radiation dose as compared to those in the lowest-dose group, according to a team of American and Russian researchers led by Scott Davis, Ph.D., and colleagues at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. They report their findings in the September issue of Radiation Research. “This is the first study of its kind to establish a dose-response relationship between radiation dose from Chernobyl and thyroid cancer,” said Davis, referring to the observation that as radiation doses increase, so does the risk of thyroid cancer. “We found a significant increased risk of thyroid cancer among people exposed as children to radiation from Chernobyl, and that the risk increased as a function of radiation dose.” Having such information in hand, Davis said, may help officials better predict what long-term health effects to expect in the event of a similar nuclear accident or terrorist attack. “Another potential benefit of the findings is that it allows officials to more accurately understand and document the magnitude of the thyroid-cancer burden that has resulted from Chernobyl. This information will be important in designing and maintaining programs targeted toward the victims of the disaster.” While about 30 people were killed immediately from the blast, which remains the worst accident of its kind in history, an estimated 5 million people were exposed to the resulting radiation. “Prior to Chernobyl, thyroid cancer in children was practically nonexistent. Today we see dozens and dozens of cases a year in the regions contaminated by the disaster, and the incidence continues to rise,” Davis said. “This provides some evidence that there’s an excess of thyroid cancer in children and in people who were children at the time of the accident. However until now nobody had taken the next step to find out just how much a risk there is and whether it rises along with radiation dose.” “After all these years, many efforts have been made by various research groups around the world to study the health effects of Chernobyl, and hundreds of scientific papers have been published. But ours is the first report that provides quantitative estimates of thyroid-cancer risk in relation to individual estimates of radiation dose,” said Davis, also chairman of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine in Seattle. end partial quote. The paper is entitled “Risk of Thyroid Cancer in the Bryansk Oblast of the Russian Federation after the Chernobyl Power Station Accident,” and is cataloged here: http://www.rrjournal.org/doi/abs/10.1667/RR3233?journalCode=rare Risk of Thyroid Cancer in the Bryansk Oblast of the Russian Federation after the Chernobyl Power Station Accident Scott Davis 1a,b, Valery Stepanenko c, Nikolai Rivkind d, Kenneth J. Kopecky a,e, Paul Voillequé f, Vladimir Shakhtarin c, Evgeni Parshkov c, Sergei Kulikov g, Evgeni Lushnikov c, Alexander Abrosimov c, Vladislav Troshin h, Galina Romanova d, Vladimir Doroschenko d, Anatoli Proshin d, and Anatoly Tsyb c a Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington b Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington c Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, Russia d Bryansk Diagnostic Center, Bryansk, Russia e Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington f MJP Risk Assessment, Denver, Colorado g National Center of Hematology, Moscow, Russia h Bryansk Institute of Pathology, Bryansk, Russia

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1356259/

Journal List
Ann Surg
v.239(4); Apr 2004
PMC1356259

Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure
Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD

From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California.

“Latency Period of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Tumors

Although some sporadic tumors unrelated to radiation may be included among our patients, the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively (Fig. 1).”

end quote

The latent period of Childhood Thyroid Cancer in Belarus Post Chernobyl

http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/NSRG/reports/kr79/kr79pdf/Malko2.pdf

Chernobyl Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancers in Belarus
Mikhail V. MALKO
Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus
Krasin Str. 99, Minsk, Sosny, 220109, Republic
of Belarus: mvmalko@malkom.belpak.minsk.by QUOTE: ” absence of marked latency period is another feature of radiation-induced thyroid cancers caused in Belarus as a result of this accident. “

The findings of this research directly contradict the self serving statement of Prof. Suzuki of Fukushima Medical University and Dr Yamashita. Of course the paper is from Belarus and they are not Anglo or Japanese. Does not lower their credibility or skill in the eyes of the unbiased intent on social engineering purity perhaps, maybe.

The latency of radiation induced childhood thyroid cancer was NOT found to be five years or more.

Belus: (my graphs)

Each year after the Chernobyl event shows a rough doubling of new cases of childhood thyroid cancer. The doubling occurs from the low base of this naturally rare disease.
The first four years then represent a period of great increase. These years represent a PRECURSOR PERIOD prior to
a huge and tragic tsunami of childhood thyroid cancer in children. This disease is NOT a minor illness.

It is tragic that the rapid rise in childhood thyroid cancer the children of Fukushima is being dismissed by
officials in Japan. They are ignoring warning of possible
future events, event as they reference Chernobyl, but without citation, in their haste to ignore the present victims.
See also:

http://ec.europa.eu/energy/nuclear/radiation_protection/doc/scientific_seminar/2010/sir_d_williams_thyroid_cancers_after_chernobyl_accident.pdf

See also

http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/pdfs/wtchpminlatcancer2013-05-01.pdf
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Latency of Childhood Thyroid Cancer

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17452969

Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2007 May;3(5):422-9.
Mechanisms of Disease: molecular genetics of childhood thyroid cancers.
Yamashita S, Saenko V.
Source

Department of Molecular Medicine, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Japan. shun@nagasaki-u.ac.jp
Abstract

Childhood thyroid cancers are uncommon and have a fairly good prognosis. Papillary adenocarcinoma is the most prevalent malignant tumor of the thyroid in children and adults with radiation-induced or sporadic cancer. The incidence of thyroid cancer in children increased dramatically in the territories affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident; this increase is probably attributable to (131)I and other short-lived isotopes of iodine released into the environment. There was a broad range of latency periods in children who developed thyroid cancer; some periods were less than 5 years.

at the very least, the evidence is that the Japanese authorities charged with protecting nuclear power by ignoring science while pretending to be scientific had better go back to school and read the relevant evidence. It is not scientifically appropriate to take a position, maintain it as if it were a Papal Bull issued in 1530 and then question those and charge those who present the evidence as being “scientifically inappropriate”. This is not legitimate and is NOT unbiased peer review. NO CONTRARY EVIDENCE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED IN SUPPORT OF THE CHARGES LAID AGAINST PROF TSUDA BY THOSE CHARGED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF JAPAN TO FULFILL ITS POLICIES. ie Fukushima medicial university is in the service of the people who pay it.

That comes down to the Japanese government and all it stands for in this matter.

Thyroid cancer found in 12 minors in Fukushima

Whereas many experts in nuclear power claim the latent period between exposure and thyroid disease, including cancer, is several years to half a decade, as the previous posts show, qualified medical research defines the latent period for thyroid cancer in children as being 12 months or more.

The US CDC give 2.5 years as the latent period.

Thyroid cancer in children in Belarus saw a doubling of the background rate in the first twelve months after the Chernobyl accident. This doubling was considered, the rate of incidence doubling every year for 4 years. In the fifth year there was a massive increase. The massive increase in rate at the five year mark was marked by several years of rate of incidence doubling.

On the basis of the actual events and incidence rate increases in Belarus from 1987 onward, it is incorrect for Fukushima Hospital staff to deny this increase occurred. The “mere” doubling seen early on in Belarus presaged a massive increase in the disease. In fact, a consistent doubling of a naturally very rare disease is tragic.

The loss of the thyroid gland is not a trivial medical event. In every case the individual and the family bears the cost.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/06/05/national/fukushima-survey-lists-12-confirmed-15-suspected-thyroid-cancer-cases/#.UbCB7Ovrk7A

Japan Times.

Kyodo.
FUKUSHIMA – An ongoing study on the impact of radiation on Fukushima residents from the crippled atomic power plant has found 12 minors with confirmed thyroid cancer diagnoses, up from three in a report in February, with 15 other suspected cases, up from seven, researchers announced Wednesday.

The figures were taken from about 174,000 people aged 18 or younger whose initial thyroid screening results have been confirmed.

Researchers at Fukushima Medical University, which has been taking the leading role in the study, have said they do not believe the most recent cases are related to the nuclear crisis.

They point out that thyroid cancer cases were not found among children hit by the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident until four to five years later.

The prefecture’s thyroid screenings target 360,000 people who were aged 18 or younger when the March 2011 mega-quake and tsunami triggered the meltdown crisis at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant.

The initial-phase checks looked at lumps and other possible thyroid cancer symptoms and categorized possible cases into four groups depending on the degree of seriousness. Those in the two most serious groups were picked for secondary exams.

In fiscal 2011, after confirming test results from about 40,000 minors, the prefecture sent 205 for secondary testing. Of the 205, seven were diagnosed with thyroid cancer, four came out with suspected cases, and another had surgery but the tumor was found to be benign.

In fiscal 2012, of about 134,000 minors with confirmed initial screening results, the prefecture sent 935 to secondary testing. Among them, five were confirmed with thyroid cancer, while there were 11 suspected cases.

In the Chernobyl catastrophe, thyroid cancer was reported in more than 6,000 children. The U.N. Scientific Committee attributed many of the cases to consumption of milk contaminated with radioactive iodine immediately after the crisis started.

Last month, U.N. scientists assessing the health impact of the Fukushima nuclear crisis said the radiation dose for residents in the region was much lower than Chernobyl and that they do not expect to see any increase in cancer in the future.

Among those aged 10 to 14 in Japan, thyroid cancer strikes about 1 to 2 in a million.

end quote.

““Shinichi Suzuki, a professor from Fukushima Medical University, stated at a panel meeting for the ongoing health impact following the nuclear disaster that it was still too early to directly link the cancer cases with Fukushima meltdowns. While this is somewhat hard to believe, what with the 2011 nuclear crisis being the worst disaster since Chernobyl in 1986, and three people from the prefecture just “coincidentally” developing cancer in following months, it was Chernobyl itself that showed it takes at least four to five years for the disease to be detected.” Source: Japan Daily Press, http://japandailypress.com/2-more-cases-
of-thyroid-cancer-found-in-fukushima-youths-1323295

Nearly time to quote the content of the sources FMU use without citing. There is a PROFOUND DIFFERENCE between what the reports of the investigations found and reported, and what Yamashita, Suzuki and others at the FMU claim they say.

Thyroid Cancer in Fukushima: Science Subverted in the Service of the State

http://japanfocus.org/-Iwata-Wataru/3841

Thyroid Cancer in Fukushima: Science Subverted in the Service of the State

Iwata Wataru, Nadine Ribault and Thierry Ribault

On 11 September 2012, in a conference room in a hotel in Fukushima city, Professor Yamashita Shunichi presented the latest results of the Fukushima Prefectural People’s Health Management Survey, launched in June 2011. Twenty-seven people were in the audience, mainly journalists. The CRMS (Citizen’s Radiation Measuring Station network) was one of two citizen groups present on that day.

Last year Yamashita had recommended that the people of Fukushima smile in order to better face radiation, and he stated that 100 mSv per year1 is an acceptable radiation exposure limit. Today he sits before the “exploratory committee” of the survey, which he presides over. This committee is comprised of eight core members and some thirty collaborators from the Fukushima Medical University. The host of this research project is Fukushima Prefecture with core members from several different Japanese scientific institutions and officials from Fukushima Prefecture, as well as members from Hiroshima and Nagasaki Universities. At the eighth meeting of the exploratory committee, a representative of the health division of the Ministry of Environment and the vice-president of the Science Council of Japan joined the committee.

The final objectives of the Fukushima health survey were set by Yamashita and Prof. Suzuki Shinichi even before obtaining the first results. They were: “to calm the anxiety of the population” and to convince doubters that “the health impact of the nuclear accident of Fukushima can be assumed to be very minor.” The initial statement made at the start of the survey on July 24th 2011 during the third meeting of the exploratory committee was that,

“at the present time, the health effects of the radiation caused by the Fukushima NPP accident might be extremely low as far as both internal and external exposure are concerned. The only symptom (disease) that was clearly recognized after the Chernobyl accident is an increasing number of childhood thyroid cancer cases because of internal irradiation by radioactive iodine, an increase in other symptoms not having been identified” . . . “After the long term effect of the Chernobyl accident, mental health issues were pointed out, so the residents in the areas of exposure presented symptoms of anxiety and inexplicable symptoms of their body” . . . “In Fukushima, the same kinds of psychological effect are expected to emerge.”

Clearly, the investigators leading the Fukushima Prefectural People’s Health Management Survey have very strong prior beliefs regarding the health impact of the nuclear accident. They believe that the study will not detect any physical effect of the accident; rather, the survey is being conducted “to calm the anxiety of the population.” This is a difficult starting point for a scientific investigation. Typically a scientific study is designed so as to be able to detect an effect and lead the investigator to accept or reject a stated hypothesis. This is the basis for calculating the necessary sample size to reject a null hypothesis. In this case, they have a strong prior belief that there is no physical effect of exposure. If the study produces evidence counter to their prior belief, the investigators are left with a problem of how to interpret it.Can they reject their starting beliefs and accept the counter-hypothesis (i.e., that the accident caused some health effects)? It is not clear they have a framework for doing that or have figured out properly what sort of weight of evidence could cause them to reject their starting assumption.Can such a study protect the interests of people in the wake of the most serious nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, which took place twenty-five years earlier with devastating effects on human and animal life and the environment?

Scientific results matching the expectations of the survey makers

The objective of the meeting is ostensibly to present the results of one phase of the Prefectural People’s Health Management Survey, namely that portion dealing with thyroid condition among children. The group surveyed is comprised of the 38,114 children of the prefecture residing in the 13 towns and villages located in areas designated as highly contaminated and restricted access zones after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant meltdown. This means that there was no control sample from elsewhere in Japan that was not affected by fallout at this time or earlier. The survey does, however, include 42,060 children from other parts of the prefecture.

One case of thyroid cancer was announced on 11 September 2012, one and a half years after the nuclear accident, by Professor Suzuki Shinichi, who heads the division dealing with thyroid checking at the Medical University. The age and the sex of the child were not made public. We should mention that childhood thyroid cancer has occurred in 1-2 out of 1 million children. Such rarity of childhood thyroid cancer in the general population made it difficult for institutions such as the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the International Atomic Energy Association to ignore the effects of radiation exposure on thyroid cancer following the Chernobyl accident.

According to Prof. Suzuki, “in Fukushima there was neither the major external exposure found in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, nor the major internal exposure found in Chernobyl.” In his view, there is no relation between this first declared case of thyroid cancer and the nuclear accident in Fukushima. This is for three reasons:

First, according to Suzuki, aside from times of disaster, it is rare to have thyroid examination surveys and echographies of children. So no “reference” survey is available with which to understand the prevalence of thyroid disease in children, subjected to similar intensive thyroid screening, in the absence of radiation exposures from an accident. However, in fact a survey was conducted by Prof. Yamashita and his team in 2000. This survey examined abnormalities of the thyroid among 250 school children in Nagasaki where only 0.8% of the children surveyed were found to have nodules and none had malignant disease.2 So, while the sample is limited, it should be considered a useful reference survey.

Second, again according to Suzuki, “if we refer to data from Chernobyl, an increasing incidence of childhood thyroid cancer was found from four years after the Chernobyl accident.” However, such an argument is silent on the political context in the years following the 1986 accident. At that time there was no reliable access to data and surveys. The testimony of Dr. Alexey Yablokov is helpful for grasping the situation: up to 1990, the Health Ministry of the Soviet Union ordered doctors not to ”connect diseases with radiation” and “all data were classified for the first three years.” Two important decisions were taken right after the Chernobyl accident by the Soviet authorities under the seal “Absolutely Confidential”. The first was to keep secret any information related to the catastrophe, especially information related to the health of the affected population. The second was taken by both Ministries of Health and of Defense of the USSR: it was aimed at concealing the level of radiation received by the population and by the “liquidators”. Moreover the two decisions instructed the medical staff not to mention the diagnosis of “radiation disease” in the personal files and to replace it with another disease.3 In other words, Soviet political calculations overrode scientific considerations in the four years following the Chernobyl accident. It would be regrettable if political calculations led to the suppression of scientific findings in the Fukushima case. Also, Prof. Yamashita’s past report on Chernobyl concluded that the data from before 1990, that is before the Soviet break-up, but which were only made available later, are not relevant and are not sufficiently detailed. In other words, he concluded, it is difficult to quantify levels of cancer in Chernobyl in the years immediately following the accident.

Third, again according to Suzuki, the technical tools available to scientists today are so developed that even small size cancers can be detected, something that was impossible in the past. We note that such an argument was also widely used to explain the large increase in thyroid cancer cases from 1990 in Chernobyl. If we recognize that the development of technical tools makes it possible to detect more thyroid abnormalities and cancer cases today, and to detect them earlier than in the past, then if these tools had been available at the time of the Chernobyl accident, the evolution of excess thyroid cancer cases might have been detected earlier. In short, such arguments cannot disconnect the present effects of radiation from the thyroid cancer cases which are detected.

Surprisingly, there was no discussion at all about the possible effect of migration on the thyroid abnormality rate of the two groups. As noted above, 35% of the first group of 38,114 children examined were identified as having nodules of a size under 5 mm and cysts under 20 mm, while among the 42,060 children in the second population subject to thyroid screening, this figure was 43%. The first group was drawn from 13 towns and villages located in areas designated as highly contaminated and in restricted access zones after the accident at the nuclear power plant, where the migration rate following the accident was 14%. The second group was drawn from Fukushima city, which is more distant from the plant, and where the migration rate was much lower at 3%. Since in both groups the children who migrated were also tracked and tested, does it mean that the more children migrated, the fewer abnormalities of the thyroid are to be found? If such a relation were to be confirmed, it would help to identify a direct relation between thyroid abnormalities and the degree and length of exposure to the fallout. It would also deeply call into question the government’s strategy of limitation of population movements after the accident that was clearly set forth in the definition and settlement of concentric evacuation zones. From the beginning, the Japanese state placed Fukushima city (and other “distant” cities) beyond the reach of the fallout. Detailed data should be made available to make it possible to check the reality of such relationships. It could also help to consider whether evacuation of children, who are particularly vulnerable to exposure to other radionuclides, should be considered even now from Fukushima City and other localities outside the evacuation zones.

Of course the first possible factor to consider in order to explain the numbers of nodules and cysts is the level of radiation people were exposed to. What can presently be said is that:

A massive amount of I-131 in the form of gas and dust was diffused from the explosion of the third reactor on March 14, 2011.
Some towns and villages close to the nuclear power plant evacuated part of their population from Fukushima Prefecture on the 12th, 13th or 14th of March, depending on each local government.
Personal dose reconstruction by simulation and estimation is to be conducted by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and the results have not yet been published.Therefore, we still don’t know how much internal radiation people received at the very beginning of the accident.
Basic research (questionnaire on activity and food intake from March 11 to 31 included in the Health Management Survey) has produced results for only 22.9%, 470,593 out of the total Fukushima population of 2,056,994.
Research on dose estimation from external exposure alone has been completed only on 7.8% in a first group drawn from 13 towns and villages, while for the entire prefecture only 23.5% has been completed. Up to now, we can only conclude that the question should remain open pending further data.
The data should be made accessible and transparent to the public, including the results of the thyroid screening, the health examination and the total amount of estimated personal dose.

We don’t know the precise amount of received dose. But the question remains and only transparency and freedom of information will allow us to draw conclusions. Therefore, the role of third parties consisting of scientists, lawyers, politicians and residents is necessary. We are surprised to learn that a radiation’s epidemiology research team from the French Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) contacted Prof. Yamashita and his team in order to obtain access to the thyroid survey data last June, but received no reply to their request.

Although it should be considered praiseworthy to so quickly launch such a large health survey with significant technical and human resources, we still cannot understand clearly the real motives of Yamashita and Suzuki as illustrated by the following. First, Yamashita failed to arrange for the distribution of stable iodine pills to the population immediately after the accident. Second, Yamashita and Suzuki have repeatedly tried to slow the process of examination of children through other health structures inside and outside Fukushima. In a letter sent to the members of the Japan Thyroid Association on January 16, 2012, discussing the parents of children being examined without any finding of “abnormal”nodules and/or cysts, Yamashita and Suzuki made the following request: “Please explain to them well to be sure they understand that any further testing is not necessary before the next scheduled examination two years hence unless symptoms appear.”

Dr. Hoshi, Commissioner of the Fukushima Medical Association, who participated in the health survey presentation, reiterated the researchers’ fear of losing the high ground on their sample when he observed that the second level examination of children is moving too slowly, and that “if we don’t prepare the second level examination more quickly, the patients will slip through our hands.”

We should also bear in mind that we owe to Yamashita and his colleagues the idea of tracking all those who took refuge outside of Fukushima prefecture, using their application for compensation payments as people affected by the nuclear accident. The statements quoted above clearly reveal the concern on the part of survey committee members to discourage the 70,000 people who officially left the prefecture (not to mention the many undeclared migrants) from receiving health examinations not conducted under the supervision of by the Fukushima Medical University team. In response to such determination, medical associations in Sapporo (Hokkaido) decided to conduct their own independent examinations of child migrants from Fukushima to Hokkaido following the protocol of the Fukushima Medical Association, and citizens associations are now organizing to pressure the authorities to provide access to free medical examinations for nuclear refugees outside Fukushima Prefecture.

The unification of information

A few hours after the conference, Kyodo News echoed the official press release, sayingthat “a single case of thyroid cancer was identified among the 80,000 children examined.” This was a grave mistake!

The 95-page report presenting the survey results reveals a different reality. According to previous results published on 26 April 2012, 35% of the first population of 38,114 children being examined were identified as having nodules of a size under 5 mm and cysts under 20 mm, symptoms that the scientists in charge of the survey considered “normal”. However, one hundred and eighty six children, 0.5%, were identified with nodules over 5mm and cysts over 20 mm. Those children are to receive a second examination (more precise echo examination, blood testing, urine testing, and aspiration biopsy cytology). Yet five months later, only 60 of the 186 children scheduled to receive a second examination have actually received it, and only 38 of those examined actually completed the second examination: 10 of them have been reintroduced into the “normal” cycle of an examination every 2 years; 28 were directed toward a thyroid cytology. Half of those children were finally told that “there is no necessity for an aspiration biopsy cytology” with the result that it was performed on just 14 children. It is thus among those 14 children alone that one thyroid cancer case was officially diagnosed.

Among the 42,060 children comprising the second population subject to thyroid screening, 239, 0.6%, have been identified with nodules over 5mm and cysts over 20mm. Those children will also receive a second examination. We cannot say anything about them prior to the second examination.

So if we bring together the 239 children of this second population waiting for a second examination and the 148 children (186-38) of the first population who are to be reexamined but who have not yet been reexamined, we have a total of 387 children about whom nothing can be said prior to completion of examination.

Consequently, the unique case of thyroid cancer identified thus far cannot be compared either to the 38,114 children who comprise the first population group, or to the 42,060 children of the second population group, still less to the 80,174 children of the total surveyed population.

Any attempt, even tentative, to provide a ratio at present is pure speculation. Once the 387 children scheduled to receive the second step examination have completed it, it will be possible to compare the total number of observed cancers to the whole population of children surveyed and to a control population. Of course, the validity of such a ratio will only hold until the next examination of the same children, and the 280,000 other children from other parts of the Prefecture that the Medical University of Fukushima plans to check who are still waiting to receive their first examination.

It is therefore premature to draw conclusions about these findings in the absence of control groups. Large scale screening of thyroids tends to lead to detection of many abnormalities that would otherwise go undetected, which makes it difficult to interpret the screening results.The single case found is itself important given the rarity of the outcome, but without details on the age, sex, and location of the case, and without completion of the pending tests, it is hard to judge how rare it really is.

To provide medical care or “to set a science record”?

Such clarification is crucial since we cannot neglect the fact that never, even in Chernobyl, has science had access to such a large population sample. Last year in an interview with a newspaper Yamashita described the Fukushima health survey: “We know from Chernobyl that the psychological consequences are enormous … relocation is not easy, and the stress is very great. We must not only track those problems, but also treat them. Otherwise people will feel they are just guinea pigs in our research.”

Yamashita’s prime objective is “to set a science record.” The Medical University of Fukushima has announced it will engage next year in a large “collection of DNA samples from volunteers and hunt for abnormalities in their genes due to radiation damage.”

The first problem, as explained above, is that there is a risk that the team in charge of the Fukushima Prefectural People’s Health Management Survey is biasing the results since its final objective was “to calm the anxiety of the population.”

Second, there is a lack of transparency concerning the survey results. The research is closed and the data are not made available to the public. For example, even though patients receive prints of their own ultrasound, they have to make a complex request through the Freedom of Information Act in order to obtain access to the complete set of their own file. The quality of the prints, moreover, is terrible. Matsui Shiro, in charge of public relations at the Fukushima Medical University, has stated that the reason for not providing the patients with high quality prints is that people could rather easily “falsify” them. We would like to know who, and for what purpose, Fukushima Medical University expects that someone would wish to falsify the prints. Shimizu Tsutomu, chief committee member of the committee on information and communication from the Japan Federation of Bar Associations points out that concern that the picture of the echo-screening might be falsified could not be the reason for refusing access to information since the Fukushima Medical University needs only to keep the original record (Mainichi newspaper, 26 August 2012).

Third, the quantitative concern of Yamashita’s team is related to its goal of controlling the scientific results and the process of securing such results. The objective is to be accepted as an authority, and Prof. Yamashita has a certain experience in that field. Actually he and his team already “set a scientific record” with the research surveys they conducted with 200,000 children from Chernobyl in the early 1990’s.4 Those surveys underestimated the effects of the Chernobyl accident on children by supporting the idea that only some thousands of “avoidable cases” of thyroid cancer (meaning cancers considered to be medically treatable) appeared after the nuclear accident. Two thousand such “avoidable cases” were found according to a report from WHO (Les conséquences de Tchernobyl et d’autres accidents radiologiques sur la santé -WHO/EGH95II – Geneva 20/23 november 1995); 6000 cases according to Dr. Malcom Crick, Principal Officer of UNSCEAR who recently declared : “after Chernobyl, the only public health impact that we have seen has been the more than 6000 thyroid cancers among those people that were children at the time of the accident, drinking contaminated milk. Of those 6000 or more perhaps 15 have died.” (Video Fukushima and Chernobyl – Myth and Reality, 26 march 2012 ).

Those surveys underestimated the effects of the Chernobyl accident on children by supporting the idea that only some thousands of “avoidable cases” of thyroid cancers (meaning cancers considered to be medically treatable) appeared after the nuclear accident without mentionning that when the Chernobyl thyroid cancer cases were found in the early 1990s, it was also found that the cancer had already metastasized to the lung and lymph.

Iwata Wataru is commissioner in charge of measurement and (system) design at CRMS (Citizen’s Radiation Measuring Station).

Nadine Ribault is a writer and Thierry Ribault is researcher at CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research, Maison Franco-Japonaise in Tokyo). They are authors of:

Les Sanctuaires de l’abîme – Chronique du désastre de Fukushima

Published by les Editions de l’Encyclopédie des Nuisances, Paris, 2012.

This is a revised and expanded version of an article that was originally published in French as Cancer de la thyroïde à Fukushima: des chiffres manipulés, Rue 89 20 Septembre 2012. Photographs © Ribault.

We thank Mark Selden and two anonymous experts who reviewed the article and proposed stimulating amendments. The authors remain responsible for the conclusions.

Sources:

Results of Fukushima Prefectural People’s Health Management Survey presented on September 11, 2012

Site of the Fukushima Prefectural People’s Health Management Survey

English translation of the first part of the Survey

Recommended citation: Iwata Wataru, Nadine Ribault and Thierry Ribault, “Thyroid Cancer in Fukushima: Science Subverted in the Service of the State,” The Asia-Pacific Journal, Vol 10 Issue 41, No. 2, October 8, 2012.


The mystery of Dr Yamashita, Suzuki and FMU in the Light of Operation Peppermint

“Insisting that it was important to avoid frightening Fukushima residents over radiation exposure, Dr Yamashita gave speeches saying, “there is no data that shows that the risk of cancer increases with exposure of less than 100 mSv per year”, “radiation doesn’t affect people who smile”, and “this is a state of emergency…as responsible citizens we should rest assured in following the government’s line.” These comments had the unintended effect of greatly increasing distrust and unease.

Dr Yamashita’s comments are consistent with the position of the Japanese government, which had previously forced the “duty of endurance” onto its citizens in a state of emergency during the Asia-Pacific War. In 1980 at the Conference on Basic Problems Regarding Measures for A-bomb Victims following demands from hibakusha groups for compensation, the then Ministry of Welfare determined that, “In war, a state of emergency into which the nation enters over its very fate, it is the duty of the citizen to sacrifice life, person and property; this means that all citizens must endure war time sacrifices equally.”15 The Japanese government has merely replaced “war damage” with “radiation exposure” as the duty of endurance this time.” (Source: The Asia-Pacific Journal, Vol. 11, Issue 23, No. 1. June 10, 2013. “Scientists and Research on the Effects of Radiation Exposure: From Hiroshima to Fukushima” Sawada Shoji, Translated by Jason Buckley)

Operation Peppermint.

” World War II – 1940′s

There were two key factors leading up to WW II that required the development of ruggedized portable radiation instruments. The first was the concern that the Germans would lace the beaches of Normandy with radioactive materials to deter U.S. and Allied landing teams and was code named Operation Peppermint. The second was intelligence that Germans would mark their anti-tank mines with radioactive materials so they could easily identify where they were buried and was code named Project Mamie.

In 1942, the U.S. was concerned that the Germans were making progress on either an atomic bomb or production of radioactive materials. The U.S. initiated a program of high priority in late 1942 to develop portable radiation instruments for field use. The two primary contributors were the Metallurgical Lab (Met Lab) in Chicago and the Victoreen Instrument Company. By 1943, several instruments were developed for field use and evaluation. Victoreen provided 48 instruments. The instrument ranges were 0-10 R/day (24 units) and 0-200 R/h (24 units). The units were positioned at several locations around the U.S. with instructions for use. The remaining instruments were left at the Met Lab for use by scientists in the event of a radioactive attack. The scientists would assist in measurements and interpretation of the data. The programs primary concern, however, was in the event of an atomic bomb attack on a U.S. city. One indication of a large scale attack would be the blackening of x-ray films. Operation Peppermint was the U.S. military response to the potential of radioactive materials being used against US forces invading Europe at Normandy beaches. The thought was that the beaches would be laced with radioactive materials to deter or slow the beach invasion. Fortunately radioactive materials were not used during the invasion.

The U.S. decided to brief the British of the possible use of radioactive materials by the Germans and instructed on how to identify it. They were also given a few radiation detection instruments. European Commands were instructed to report any fogging of x-ray film. The small team trained with the instruments would respond and investigate any unusual fogging incidents.

General Groves decided to info the General Eisenhower, Commanding General, Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force of the possible use of radioactive materials by the Germans during the invasion. Major Peterson was dispatched to the United Kingdom to brief General Eisenhower. He was briefing in Apr 1944. In order to prepare U.S. troops, a plan code named Peppermint was developed. Three aspects were included:

1. Centralization of all detection equipment.

2. Establishment of a method for the initial detection.

3. Effective channels for reporting to Headquarters.

Participating Commands were instructed to report unusual film fogging, certain clinical symptoms and medical cases. The British soon followed suit. The British agreed to employ the Cavendish Laboratories at Cambridge University to assist in identifying the type of radioactive material.

The equipment deployed to Britain included 1500 film packets, 11 survey meters, and 1 Geiger counter. Additional equipment consisting of 1500 film packets, 25 survey meters and 5 Geiger counter were kept in reserve in the U.S. Commercial companies were also completing the development of an additional 200 survey meters and 25 Geiger counters.

Dry runs were conducted prior to the Normandy invasion to test the equipment and provide field experience for the deploying personnel. Bombed areas along the coast of England were surveyed for radioactive materials but none found. ” Source: http://national-radiation-instrument-catalog.com/new_page_114.htm

STAFF MEMORANDUM

TO: Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments
FROM: Advisory Committee Staff
DATE: June 28, 1994
RE: Historical Background on Radiological Warfare and Human Experiments

Military research in the area of Radiological Warfare was one possible motive behind human radiation experiments. Many, if not most of the human experiments being studied by the staff had more than one purpose, as so-called dual-use experiments. It is possible,
though not yet proven, that some of the human experiments were primarily inspired by military interest in RW. It is certain that the majority of the intentional releases described in the November 1993 GAO report were directly related to RW research. The purpose of this memorandum is to provide some brief historical background on RW
and its possible relation to human radiation experiments.

Interest in RW began with the Manhattan Project also known as “Manhattan Engineer District” or “MED” in 1942. That year, when the National Academy of Sciences assessed the potential military value of atomic energy, RW was ranked first in importance, above the less-certain prospect of a fission bomb. When the Medical Division
of the MED was established in spring 1943, research on the offensive and defensive uses of radiological agents was included in its charter. One early result of this interest was the so-called Compton Report of summer 1943, “Radiation as a War Weapon,” a version of which was included in the previous Briefing Book. The idea at that time was to spread fission products from a nuclear reactor upon the
ground as a crude “area denial” weapon. Another idea, entertained briefly in 1943 by Robert Oppenheimer and Berkeley physicians Joseph Hamilton and Robert Stone, two of those subsequently involved in the plutonium injection story, was to put a radiological agent like
strontium in the enemy’s food and water supply. (See Hamilton’s report to Groves of May 1943, “Review of Possible Applications of Fission Products in Offensive Warfare.” )

By early 1944, when it was believed likely that the atomic
bomb would work, Army interest in RW shifted to a defensive program, code named “Operation Peppermint, ” which centered upon the possible threat of German use of RW agents against the Allied invasion of Europe. After June 1944, when it became clear that the German atomic program posed no threat, interest in RW began to decline.

However, interest revived in summer 1946, when results of the “Baker” test at Bikini, a 20-kiloton atomic bomb set off underwater as part of “Operation Crossroads,” alarmed and excited those interested in RW, as related in a recent book by Jonathan Weisgal. Unexpectedly, “Baker” proved to be a radiological nightmare: the contamination problem was much worse than the Navy had anticipated, both for ships and for people. Shortly after “Baker,” the Joint
Chiefs completed a secret study pointing out the offensive potential of an atomic bomb set off underwater in a port city. The study emphasized that, in addition to the highly-radioactive “base surge” from the weapon, the radioactive mist from the explosion would travel far inland and kill many people. Accordingly, after “Baker,” RW experienced a renaissance; the interest this time, however, was in
radioactive aerosols. Joseph Hamilton’s December 1946 report on RW, which urged Nichols to establish a civilian advisory board on RW “of men trained in the medical and biological sciences,” is attached as Document #1. end quote

Source: Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments to the President of the United States, http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/radiation/dir/mstreet/commeet/meet4/brief4.gfr/tab_o/br4o5.txt

The historic record shows that reactor effluent was considered a AAA priority asset early in the Manhattan Project. If the atomic bomb had not worked, the USA had plans to use bombs and artillery shell packed with reactor effluent and explosive against the enemy. Hamilton suggested radio strontium for this purpose.

Plans were made to protect US troops and civilians against a Nazi attack of a similar nature.

The Normandy landings were considered vulnerable to Nazi radiological attack and rational steps were taken to detect and counteract any such use of radioactive poisons by the Nazis.

In both the above cases, the substances considered most dangerous were those produced in quantity by nuclear reactors.

Even though the Nazi radiological threat did not eventuate, the Allies took rational steps to counter the threat to produce such weapons themselves.

At no stage were allied troops or civilians told that the best defense against such a threat as nuclear reactor effluent spread over an area was to smile and be happy.

Yet Yamashita and FMU is on the record as prescribing this “antidote” to people in a nuclear fallout field.

Those who do not comply are according to Yamashita, mentally ill. However, the Australian Army disagrees, specifically, my Captain and my Warrant Officer, who authored the following in the 1970s (its typed by me but it was triple checked in 1972.) as we prepared from nuclear disaster of various kinds, including incoming French fallout.

“The chemical basis for mental effects from exposure to radiological insult

Army radiological safety training notes, Radiac Centre, 4 base workshop, RAEME, circa 1972, authors, OIC Capt J Smiley, 2 IC WO J Peacock, typiste CPl P Langley. Copyright waived. Unclassified. “Use them however you like Paul” These notes provide the chemical basis for the psychological effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. The so called experts in Japan who ascribe these effects to “mental weakness” on the part of nuclear victims in today’s Japan are in breach of their oaths as doctors. The very symptoms they ascribe as proof of no radiological harm is in fact documented in my military notes as proof to the contrary. These doctors must surely know it. Either way, it must be acknowledged that the physical brain is not immune to the same vectors of harm as the rest of the body.

The descriptions also apply to the effects reported suffered by the crew of the HMAS Murchison following its visit to the Port of Hiroshima in February 1946.

Smiling and being happy as Yamashita and FMU have suggested is not a primary, secondary or millionth line level treatments.

Telling the truth to patients is.

Consulting the copious scientific record is.

Breaching the copyright of Philip Morris tobacco scriptwriters may all be very well for Yamashita and FMU but the truth of what Yamashita wrote prior to March 2011 regarding his findings relating to low dose onset of thyroid cancer is. It is peer reviewed, it is dated from the 1990s, makes use of cancer records, and finds to the extreme contrary to what he and his trainees at FMU pronounce as edicts today.

ARS is NOT the only acknowledged effect of radiological insult. At lower doses partial, incomplete manifestations occur. But of course, Yamashita and his ilk dispute this, but only since March 2011. Funny that. Not.

The High Art of Dr Yamashita and FMU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkGGn28nG9Q

More information Fukushima Medical University would consider, it were consistent in its handling of cancer survey data, to be “scientifically inappropriate”:

Female Thyroid Cancer, Incidence, 1975 – 2008, all data available, official Japanese estimates

No pre 1975 data available.

Source: National estimates of cancer incidence based on cancer registries in Japan (1975-2008)
Reference to be cited: Center for Cancer Control and Information Services,
National Cancer Center, Japan
or
Matsuda A, Matsuda T, Shibata A, Katanoda K, Sobue T, Nishimoto H and The Japan Cancer Surveillance Research Group. Cancer Incidence and Incidence Rates in Japan in 2007: A Study of 21 Population-based Cancer Registries for the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) Project. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 43: 328-336, 2013

http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html

Incidence of disease in Japan prior to establishment of nuclear industry:
No data available that I can find. When authorities come to compare Fukushima close in cohort with whole of Japan, the pre existing rate of disease will attenuate impact of Fukushima Disaster.
Photo: Source: National estimates of cancer incidence based on cancer registries in Japan (1975-2008) Reference to be cited: Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, National Cancer Center, Japan or Matsuda A, Matsuda T, Shibata A, Katanoda K, Sobue T, Nishimoto H and The Japan Cancer Surveillance Research Group. Cancer Incidence and Incidence Rates in Japan in 2007: A Study of 21 Population-based Cancer Registries for the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) Project. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 43: 328-336, 2013 http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html Incidence of disease in Japan prior to establishment of nuclear industry: No data available that I can find. When authorities come to compare Fukushima close in cohort with whole of Japan, the pre existing rate of disease will attenuate impact of Fukushima Disaster.

Source: http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html Incidence (4 prefectures) Actual data, Observed cancer incidence in selected four prefectures in Japan (1975-2007); data for trend analysis Center for Cancer Control and Information Services,
National Cancer Center, Japan
or
Katanoda, K, Matsuda, T, Matsuda, A, Shibata, A, Nishino, Y, Fujita, M, Soda, M, Ioka, A, Sobue, T, Nishimoto, H. An updated report of the trends in cancer incidence and mortality in Japan. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2013; 43: 492-507
The characteristics of the 4-prefecture data are described in the following paper.
Katanoda K, Ajiki W, Matsuda T, Nishino Y, Shibata A, Fujita M, Tsukuma H, Ioka A, Soda M, Sobue T. Trend analysis of cancer incidence in Japan using data from selected population-based cancer registries. Cancer Science, 103: 360-8, 2012

From Mark Willacy’s “Fukushima” “A world health organisation study would later warn that, of all people in the fallout zone during the Fukushima meltdowns, infants in Namie would be at the greatest risk of developing thyroid cancer later in childhood. The WHO report said that, while cancer cases in Fukushima caused by radiation would not rise significantly, for a two year baby girl in Namie the incidence rate of thyroid cancer would increase nine times (Willacy citing Yuri Oiwa “WHO Forecasts No Significant Increase in Cancer Patients, the Asahi Shimbun 11 July 2012 http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201207110058

(The content of the article actually makes the headline very misleading. WHO actually predicts an explosion of female thyroid cancers in Namie.) THE FACT IS, AS REVEALED BY THE DATA PRESENTED AS A GRAPH ABOVE, THE NUMBER OF FEMALE THYROID CANCER PER ANNUM SUFFERERS HAS INCREASED NINE TIMES SINCE 1975. We cannot see the numbers from 1945 to 1974 for the whole of Japan because they seem not to exist. We cannot do a pre nuke industry/ post nuke industry establishment comparison of this, or any other illness.

IT IS VERY EASY TO SEE WHY THE FUKUSHIMA MEDICAL UNIVERSITY CONSIDERS THE USE OF CANCER STATISTICS TO BE “SCIENTIFICALLY INAPPROPRIATE”. IT DISAGREES WITH THE PAPAL BULLS ISSUED BY FMU.

WHY NO DATA PRIOR TO THE 1970S? IE PRIOR TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF NUCLEAR INDUSTRY IN JAPAN?

IT TOOK UNTIL 2013 FOR THIS DATA TO BECOME OPENLY AVAILABLE, SUCH AS IT IS.

Fukushima Medical University. Thyroid Screening results, 2011 – July 2013

See also http://fukushimavoice-eng2.blogspot.com.au/2013/08/18-thyroid-cancer-cases-confirmed-in.html?spref=tw

Important video showing human experience behind the statistics

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZD9yGONdEUY
http://www.fmu.ac.jp/radiationhealth/results/20130820.html

Survey Results
Proceedings of the 12th Prefectural Oversight Committee Meeting for Fukushima Health Management Survey

20 August 2013

This is an excerpt from the Proceedings of the 12th Prefectural Oversight Committee Meeting for Fukushima Health Management Survey, unofficially translated by the Department of International Cooperation, Radiation Medical Science Center of Fukushima Medical University. It is provided for information purposes only, and reliance should be placed on the original Japanese version of the proceedings.

Please contact us for any clarification of the contents.

Basic Survey (Appendix: Estimated external radiation dose)
Thyroid Ultrasound Examination
Comprehensive Health Check
Mental Health and Lifestyle Survey
Pregnancy and Birth Survey

THYROID RESULTS

NOT ONE CASE, ACCORDING TO YAMASHITA, SUKUZKI AND FMU, ARE DUE TO CONTAMINATION FROM THE FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR FALLOUT.

NOT ONE, BECAUSE THEY SAY, THE SCIENCE THEY QUOTE, BUT DO NOT NAME OR SOURCE, SAYS THAT FOUR YEARS MUST PASS FOR THYROID CANCER LATENCY TO BE EXCEEDED. THIS NUCLEAR INDUSTRY POSITION IS CRAP AND SHOWN TO BE CRAP BY THE PAPERS YAMASHITA, SUZUKI AND FMU ARE, IN MY OPINION, TOO GUTLESS TO NAME. I SHALL QUOTE THEM SHORTLY, ONE BEING WRITTEN BY NONE OTHER DR “EAT PLUTONIUM IT’S HARMLESS” YAMASHITA.

Film documenting Thyroid disease wins Award

http://www.nipponconnection.com/news-detail-137/items/award-winners-of-the-13th-nippon-connection-film-festival.html

The winner of the Nippon Visions Award 2013 is the documentary film A2 by Ian Thomas Ash. JVTA (Japan Visualmedia Translation Academy) will finance the subtitling for the director’s next project.

http://pressrepublican.com/0100_news/x335460239/Filmmaker-documents-unseen-threat

In June, “A2-B-C” was awarded the coveted Nippon Visions Award, the top prize for new directors at the film’s world premiere at the Nippon Connection Film Festival in Frankfurt, Germany.

“The cinema was full. A young woman who was a child of the time of the Chernobyl meltdown, she came to the screening. People were just shocked, and that it wasn’t in the news. They weren’t being told about it,” Ash said.

“As adults, we can make a choice. We evacuate or not evacuate. The children are dependent on the adults making the decisions for them. The most difficult thing for me is that I’m not sure how much good will come out of this for the people that it is happening to. Part of me thinks this is only going to mean something in the future and what I’m doing right now is not going to directly help these people, and that is very hard for me.”

“A2-B-C” upcoming screenings include the Global Peace Festival in the United States (Sept. 17 through 22), the Guam International Film Festival (Sept. 24 through 29), the Chagrin International Documentary Film Festival (Oct. 2 through 6) and the Taiwan International Ethnographic Film Festival (Oct. 4 through 8).

“I’m curious about what will happen. Even people in Tokyo don’t know what is happening. One of the things I realized in filming, as citizens of a country, … when something goes wrong, we think the government is just going to provide for us and take care of us,” Ash said.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the Fukushima disaster, he realizes that is not always the case.

“We have to be active participants in the way our government works as members of a society,” Ash said. “We have responsibilities to be good citizens as well and to be active participants in society. It’s not just sitting around and waiting for the government to do something. We have to take action to protect our children. Those mothers are taking action. They are not waiting for the government to measure radiation. They are in radioactive hot spots and measuring radiation around the school to protect their children. They are not waiting for someone to help them.”

He attributes the film’s festival-selection success to people’s desire to become more informed.

“The festival programmers want to program films about current events and things that are happening now. The film is in so many festivals in the next two months alone. I’m really shocked and pleasantly surprised at how many festivals this will be in and really grateful to share the story of the children of Fukushima with audiences all over the world,” he said.

The Japanese mothers agreed to do the film for this very reason.

“They want their story to be told,” Ash said.

Post-screenings, festival-goers ask him what they should do.

“I don’t know the answer,” Ash said. “This is the first step to get people to know there is a problem. Then, we can talk about a solution. If you don’t know there is a problem, then you can’t come up with a solution.”

….. “In the Grey Zone” was filmed closer to the damaged plant. “A2-B-C” was filmed between 40 and 50 kilometers away.

“It lies right in the path of the radioactive plume. If you see the map of where the radioactive plume went, it went northwest. These towns are farther away from the nuclear plant, but they are actually contaminated with higher levels of radiation. So because they are farther away, they were not in the original evacuation zone,” said Ash, who returns to Fukushima every month and is working on a third film.

Families outside of the evacuation zone bore the costs of relocating.

“There was no government support to do that,” Ash said. “And so, what happened was anyone who had money and could evacuate did. People who were left were people who didn’t have the money or means to evacuate. This is an area, an agricultural community, and so basically everything they had — their land, farming equipment, their homes —

was contaminated. So, they couldn’t sell it. Imagine trying to move your family when everything you have has been taken away from you.”

Email Robin Caudell:rcaudell@pressrepublican.com

Female Thyroid Cancer, Ages 15 -24, 1975 – 2008, Japan. all data available, Official Estimates

YAMASHITA AND FMU WOULD HAVE IT THAT THE FOLLOWING WILL IMPROVE AS A RESULT OF FUKUSHIMA

Source: http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html National estimates of cancer incidence based on cancer registries in Japan (1975-2008)
Reference to be cited: Center for Cancer Control and Information Services,
National Cancer Center, Japan

http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/BF02035773.pdf
Deposition of gamma-emitting nuclides in Japan after the reactor-IV accident at Chernobyl‘

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Volume 116, Issue 2 , pp 291-306
Cover Date 1987-12-01
Authors

M. Aoyama (1)
K. Hirose (1)
Y. Sugimura (1)

Author Affiliations

1. Geochemical Laboratory, Meteorological Research Institute, Nagamine 1-1, Yatabe, 305, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, (Japan)

Abstract

The wet and dry deposition of gamma-emitting nuclides are presented for Tsukuba and eleven stations in Japan following the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl’. In Japan fallout from the reactor at Chernobyl’ was first detected on May 3, 1986, a week after the accident. Abruptly high radioactive deposition, which mainly consists of131I,132I,103Ru,137Cs and134Cs, was observed in early May. The cumulative amount of131I,103Ru and137Cs in May at Tsukuba were 5854±838 Bq·m−2, 364±54 Bq·m−2 and 130±26 Bq·m−2 (decay was corrected to April 26), respectively. The monthly137Cs deposition in May corresponds to 2.5% of the cumulative137Cs deposition during the period from 1960 through 1982. Most of the Chernobyl’ radioactivities, especially131I, are scavenged from the atmosphere by the wet removal process. cost of full paper $39.95. Unless you know someone with academic access.

Year of first increase in female thyroid cancer diagnosis in Japan after Chernobyl fallout arrival in Japan – 1986. Peak effect of Chernobyl fallout on Thyroid Cancer in defined female age range in Japan – 1992.

Latent period of Thyroid Cancer: http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/NSRG/reports/kr79/kr79pdf/Malko2.pdf
Chernobyl Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancers in Belarus
Mikhail V. MALKO Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus Krasin Str. 99, Minsk, Sosny, 220109, Republic
of Belarus: mvmalko@malkom.belpak.minsk.by QUOTE: ” absence of marked latency period is another feature of radiation-induced thyroid cancers caused in Belarus as a result of this accident. “

Dr Yamashita, 2011 – 2013 – claimed five years minimum before any effect, “based on Chernobyl”

Dr Yamashita, 2007: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17452969
Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2007 May;3(5):422-9.
Mechanisms of Disease: molecular genetics of childhood thyroid cancers.
Yamashita S, Saenko V.
Department of Molecular Medicine, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Japan. shun@nagasaki-u.ac.jp
“There was a broad range of latency periods in children who developed thyroid cancer; some periods were less than 5 years.” Sprung Dr Yamashita.

US CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/pdfs/wtchpminlatcancer2013-05-01.pdf
Minimum latent period – 2.5 years.

Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1356259/

Journal List
Ann Surg
v.239(4); Apr 2004
PMC1356259

Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure
Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD

From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California.

Although some sporadic tumors unrelated to radiation may be included among our patients, the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively

end quotes.

I conclude the information provided by Dr Yamashita regarding the latency of childhood and young adult thyroid cancer is 1. Incorrect 2. Differs from Dr Yamashita’s stated conclusions published in 2007.

Further, the impact of Chernobyl in regard to Thyroid cancer in Japan from 1986 on, peaking in 1992, is fairly clear. I submit that the impact of the Fukushima Diiachi Nuclear Disaster on disease rates in Japan will be massively larger than the effect of Chernobyl fallout.

This will also be true for countries other than Japan.

Please see earlier posts which cite papers which point out the lack of a National Cancer Registry in Japan prior to the 21st century.

See previous posts which cite papers which describe the peaks of disease in Japan in the 1980s and 1990s.

No accessible data for disease rates in Japan prior to the mid 1970s, the time of the first operation of nuclear industry in Japan.

No accessible data can be found which describes disease rates in Japan from the late 2000s to the present time.

The primary data collected and released describing disease within areas in Japan since 2011 was collected under the supervision of Dr Yamashita until the very recent past.

It is a tragedy of modern medical record keeping that the best Japan can do is provide official estimates of the cancer for the period. It is extremely tragic that the people of Japan and the people of the world cannot see the trend of disease prior to the establishment of nuclear industry in Japan. However, for female thyroid cancer, the start point in 1975 was low. The end point of the date range provided, 2008, was higher, in all cases except for some very young age ranges. Of the childhood data provided, the most responsive appears to be the 15-19 years age range.

It is important for ordinary people in Japan and elsewhere to know that the data, as such exists, may be downloaded and studied form the link given above, ie download the data from

http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html National estimates of cancer incidence based on cancer registries in Japan (1975-2008)

The Statements of Dr Yamashita made prior to the Fukushima Diiachi Disaster, 2011

“Mainly for the people less than twenty-years-old, if they are exposed to excessive radiation between 10 to 100mSV, the risk of carcinogenesis is undeniable” Yamashita, quoted in ”The Light and Dark Side of Radiation: The Strategy of WHO”, The Journal of Japan Physicians Association, Vol.23 No.5, 2009.

“the lowest doses of X-rays for which reasonably reliable evidence of increased cancer risk exists range from 10 to 50mGy” N. Ghtobi, M. Morishita, A. Ohtsuru, S. Yamashita (2005). “Evidence-based guidelines needed on the use of CT scanning in Japan”JMAJ 48 (9): pp. 451-457
Link: http://www.med.or.jp/english/pdf/2005_09/451_457.pdf

These statements directly contradict the statements Dr Yamashita has repeatedly made to the people living in radiation contamination areas of Japan, the people of Japan and the people of the world. The source of the above is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shunichi_Yamashita#cite_note-16

Further Dr Yamashita identified the latent period of Thyroid Cancer in 2007 as follows:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17452969

Nat Clin Pract Endocrinol Metab. 2007 May;3(5):422-9.
Mechanisms of Disease: molecular genetics of childhood thyroid cancers.
Yamashita S, Saenko V.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Japan. shun@nagasaki-u.ac.jp
There was a broad range of latency periods in children who developed thyroid cancer; some periods were less than 5 years.

This statement is in much closer agreement with myriad qualified observations of the latent period of childhood thyroid cancer. The statement of 2007 however directly contradicts the view given by Dr Yamashita since March 2011. From the time of the disaster the doctor has been rigid in his claimed view that childhood thyroid cancer does not occur until five years after exposure.

Prior to March 2011 Dr Yamashita’s statements regarding both risk and dose and latent periods agreed with responsible, qualified, world medical evidence, findings and conclusions as published in peer reviewed journals.

Since the Fukushima Diiachi disaster Dr Yamashita’s public statements directly contradict his own and qualified world opinion.

Further, the evidence of health impacts from Chernobyl fallout in Japan (see previous post) directly contradict Dr Yamashita.

“Mr 100 mSv” was “Mr 10 mSv” prior to March 2011. However, Dr Yamashita knows that medical ethics mandates 1. Medical need via diagnosis 2. An expected benefit 3. Informed consent on the part of the patient before any medical treatment can be administered.

As there is no expected medical benefit, no medical need, no informed consent, then exposure doses imposed by nuclear pollution are unlike medical treatments and diagnostic tests.

Fallout from nuclear industry is not like a CT at all. Any attempt to justify the imposition of radiation from nuclear fallout on the basis of medicine is ethically unsound. In 1995 the US Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments concluded in its Final Report that such imposition of dose breached the provisions of the Nuremberg Protocols.
(McFaden, 1995). If there is no consent, if the ethical requirements which define medicine are absent, then men who impose dose are not acting in the interests of medicine and hence breach their oaths.

The ethical situation regarding the deliberate imposition of dose without any expectation of medical benefit and imposed by doctors and other purported medical personnel is explained by the Chair of ACHRE here: http://www.cesil.com/0798/enfade07.htm”>http://www.cesil.com/0798/enfade07.htm “Reflection on the Ethics of Biomedical research
By Ruth R, Faden”

Fukushima: Child Thyroid Cancer, August 2013

A clear explanation of the raw data, The following article is a translation of the original Japanese published by SHUEISHA on the WPB News site.

Causal link with the nuclear accident?
Child thyroid cancer cases keep rising in Fukushima

5 September, 2013

In Fukushima the number of children diagnosed with thyroid caner continues to rise.

The Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey—set up to examine the impact of radiation exposure from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident—is being conducted on children who were aged 18 or younger when the accident occurred.

In the survey, children undergo ultrasound throat examinations, which look for such thyroid abnormalities as nodules and cysts. The results of these examinations are announced periodically.

On August 20, at a meeting of the Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey Review Committee in Fukushima city, an interim report was presented on the results of the survey during the year ended March 31, 2013. At the previous committee meeting in June, it was reported that 12 children had confirmed diagnosis of thyroid cancer. At the August 20 meeting, the number had risen by six, to 18 cases. What does this number actually mean? One of the lawyers acting for litigants in the Fukushima group evacuation lawsuit, Kenichi Ido, explains.

“The prevalence of child thyroid cancer is said to be one in one million. However, Fukushima has a population of around two million, and the current survey covers approximately 360,000 children. Just looking at these results, we can clearly see that the number of cases is much higher than should be expected. Would it not be reasonable to assume that some abnormal situation has occurred?

However, at the Review Committee meeting, Professor Shinichi Suzuki of Fukushima Medical University, which is leading the survey, said that a characteristic of thyroid cancer is that it develops slowly. Based on the size of the melanomas of those diagnosed with thyroid cancer, he stated, “I believe these (cancers) did not form within the last two or three years.” To date, the committee has consistently denied any linkage between the nuclear accident and the 18 confirmed child thyroid cancer cases.

The Prefectural Health Management Survey has the explicit aim of “resolving the health-related anxiety of Fukushima residents”. However, many mothers in the prefecture are voicing their concerns over the way the survey is being conducted. “At the examinations, we are not told any results at all. Some time later, all we receive is a letter saying whether or not a second exam is necessary. If we were to take our children for a thyroid examination at an ordinary clinic, the doctor would tell us immediately if there were any abnormality, such as a nodule, and the size of the nodule.” (Mother of two, resident in Fukushima city)

Lawyer Ido believes that the survey results reports themselves are also leading to distrust. “The interim report on survey results for the year ended March 31, 2013, has been released. According to this, 953 children required secondary examinations. Of these, 30 children were reported to have ‘malignancies or suspected malignancies’. But if we look at the fine print of the report, we find that of the 953 children who required secondary exams, only 594 children have actually undergone these exams. In other words, 359 children have yet to receive these secondary examinations. Statistically speaking, there are almost certainly going to be cases of ‘malignancies or suspected malignancies’ among those children”.

However, at the Review Committee, the results announcement gave the impression that all secondary examinations had been completed. What, in fact, is the likely number of children with thyroid cancer?

Ido says, “In the survey to date, a total of 43 children have been diagnosed with ‘malignancies or suspected malignancies’—13 in the year ended March 31, 2012, and 30 in the year ended March 31, 2013. Among those still to receive secondary exams, if the rate of thyroid caner is the same as those who have undergone the exams, my calculations estimate a total of 79 children. The survey for the current year ending March 31, 2014, covers another 160,000 children. So potentially I think around 100 children have already developed thyroid caner.”

One hundred—but that includes “suspected malignancies”, doesn’t it?

Ido explains, “Although some cases are presented as “suspected”, when cytological diagnosis has been carried out following the second exam—this is the basis for the final judgment on whether the cyst or nodule is malignant—in all but a single case cancer has been confirmed. Hence, even though the initial results may be stated as “suspected”, there is an extremely high probability that the final diagnosis will be caner. The 18 cases reported on August 20 are only those who have completed the cytological diagnosis”.

While it is shocking that 18 children have already been confirmed to have thyroid caner, it is likely that many times that number will also be diagnosed with cancer. How are the people of Fukushima reacting to this reality?

“Parents with a high awareness of the risks are taking it very seriously. They are saying things like, ‘My kids were in the clear this time, but who knows about the next exam?’ Just recently, there was a family who moved to Kobe (in western Japan). The father had been against moving, but he changed his mind when he realized the risk to his children of staying. But there are a lot of people who say. ‘It’s a worry, but what can you do?’ For those in their 50s or 60s, a lot just give up and say ‘It’s too late anyway’”. (Housewife, 50s, resident in Koriyama city)

The results announced on August 20 should have grabbed the headlines and stirred heated debate. In fact, the announcement received only minimal coverage in newspapers and on television. The news barely reached the general public. It seems that even worse news will be needed before people start paying attention.

Reporting: Naoto Tonsho
© SHUEISHA INC. Thanks to Stephen Walker for this translation of the report.

The official release of information without full explanation for the public:

http://www.fmu.ac.jp/radiationhealth/results/20130820.html

Survey Results
Proceedings of the 12th Prefectural Oversight Committee Meeting for Fukushima Health Management Survey

20 August 2013

This is an excerpt from the Proceedings of the 12th Prefectural Oversight Committee Meeting for Fukushima Health Management Survey, unofficially translated by the Department of International Cooperation, Radiation Medical Science Center of Fukushima Medical University. It is provided for information purposes only, and reliance should be placed on the original Japanese version of the proceedings.

Please contact us for any clarification of the contents.

Basic Survey (Appendix: Estimated external radiation dose)
Thyroid Ultrasound Examination
Comprehensive Health Check
Mental Health and Lifestyle Survey
Pregnancy and Birth Survey

THYROID RESULTS

A Comparison of Yamashita et al 1998 and National Thyroid Cancer Data in Japan

The purpose of this post is to inform the public that :

a.Fukushima Medical University staff engaged in the Thyroid health survey of Fukushima children cite sources based on Chernobyl data which the staff claims support 1. A long 4-5 year latent period for thyroid cancer 2. A slow progression of the disease. In fact these sources actually confirm that latent periods in early onset cases of the disease post Chernobyl were very short, and these sources report that disease progression in the early onset cases post Chernobyl was rapid. The authors of these Chernobyl reports include Dr S. Yamashita, formerly of the Fukushima Medical University Fukushima Thyroid Health Survey.

b. In 2013, National Cancer statistics have been created for the period 1975 to 2008. This national data has been created from from diverse local and regional medical repositories. The data is available to the public at the link given below.

1.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9700473 Abstract

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/endocrj1993/45/2/45_2_203/_pdf Free Full Text.

Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.
Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S.
Source

First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan.

Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9.

Abstract

The high incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus is suspected to be due to radiation exposure after the Chernobyl reactor accident. To clarify the clinical and histological characteristics of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus, we therefore compared these patients to a radiation non-exposed control series in Japan. In Belarus, 26 thyroid cancers in subjects aged 15 or younger were diagnosed among 25,000 screened between 1991 and 1995 by Chernobyl-Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project. The clinical and morphologic features of these 26 cases were compared to 37 childhood thyroid cancers in Japan diagnosed between 1962 and 1995. The age distribution at operation in Belarus showed a peak at 10 years old, with a subsequent fall in numbers. In contrast, the age distribution at operation in Japan showed a smooth increase between the ages of 8 and 14. The mean tumor diameter was smaller in Belarus than that in Japan (1.4 +/- 0.7 vs. 4.1 +/- 1.7 cm, P < 0.001). The sex ratio, regional lymph node metastasis, extension to surrounding tissues or lung metastasis did not differ significantly. Histologically, all cases in Belarus were papillary and in Japan 33 cases were papillary and 4 cases were follicular carcinomas. Among papillary carcinomas, the frequency of a solid growth pattern, a criteria for classifying a tumor as poorly differentiated, was higher in Belarus than that in Japan (61.5 vs. 18.2%, P < 0.001). The difference between the features of childhood thyroid cancer in Japan and Belarus may be due to the difference in the process of carcinogenesis, but more direct evidence and further analysis by molecular epidemiology are needed in Belarussian cases. end quote

Yamashita et al above cite the Chernobyl-Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project as their data source. The public data published by this organization is : http://www.smhf.or.jp/data01/chernobyl_decade.pdf
Chernobyl A Decade – Proceedings of the Fifth Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Symposium, Kiev, Ukraine, 14-15 October 1996 (International Congress S.)
Shunichi Yamashita (Edited by), Yoshisada Shibata (Edited by)

The source of the data from which the following chart is derived is:
Center for Cancer Control and Information Services,
National Cancer Center, Japan

Matsuda A, Matsuda T, Shibata A, Katanoda K, Sobue T, Nishimoto H and The Japan Cancer Surveillance Research Group. Cancer Incidence and Incidence Rates in Japan in 2007: A Study of 21 Population-based Cancer Registries for the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) Project. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 43: 328-336, 2013 Download Source Data as Excel spreadsheets at http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html

Source: Matsuda et. al. as above.

3. http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/BF02035773.pdf
Deposition of gamma-emitting nuclides in Japan after the reactor-IV accident at Chernobyl‘

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Volume 116, Issue 2 , pp 291-306
Cover Date 1987-12-01
Authors

M. Aoyama (1)
K. Hirose (1)
Y. Sugimura (1)

Author Affiliations

1. Geochemical Laboratory, Meteorological Research Institute, Nagamine 1-1, Yatabe, 305, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, (Japan)

Abstract

The wet and dry deposition of gamma-emitting nuclides are presented for Tsukuba and eleven stations in Japan following the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl’. In Japan fallout from the reactor at Chernobyl’ was first detected on May 3, 1986, a week after the accident. Abruptly high radioactive deposition, which mainly consists of131I,132I,103Ru,137Cs and134Cs, was observed in early May. The cumulative amount of131I,103Ru and137Cs in May at Tsukuba were 5854±838 Bq·m−2, 364±54 Bq·m−2 and 130±26 Bq·m−2 (decay was corrected to April 26), respectively. The monthly137Cs deposition in May corresponds to 2.5% of the cumulative137Cs deposition during the period from 1960 through 1982. Most of the Chernobyl’ radioactivities, especially131I, are scavenged from the atmosphere by the wet removal process.

4. http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/NSRG/reports/kr79/kr79pdf/Malko2.pdf

Chernobyl Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancers in Belarus
Mikhail V. MALKO
Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus Krasin Str. 99, Minsk, Sosny, 220109, Republic
of Belarus: mvmalko@malkom.belpak.minsk.by QUOTE: ” absence of marked latency period is another feature of radiation-induced thyroid cancers caused in Belarus as a result of this accident. “

end quote.

annual averages over eight year periods:
1971 to 1978 = 10/8 = 1.25
1979 to 1986 = 6/8 = 0.75
1987 to 1994 = 331/8 = 41.38
1995 to 2002 = 241/3 = 80.33

Conclusions

Doctor Yamashita

Dr Yamashita is now well known throughout Japan and the world for communicating a particular public health perspective of risk of disease to people living within areas contaminated by the Fukushima Reactor accident of March 2011. I am therefore citing the paper “Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.“
Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S. as “Yamashita et. al.”

This paper is interesting as a comparison of Dr Yamashita’s published views in 1998 with those he has expressed since March 2011.

1. The Latent Period for Thyroid Cancer

Since the reactor accident Dr Yamashita and his colleagues in Fukushima have repeatedly stated that the experience of Chernobyl confirmed that the latent period for childhood thyroid cancer was five years. As a result, to date authorities monitoring the affected children of Fukushima have stated that no cases of thyroid cancer has yet arisen due to the Fukushima nuclear accident.

However Yamashita et al 1998, reported the following: “tumors
arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” (Yamashita et. al., 1998, pdf page 2, journal page 204). The authors consider this rapid onset of disease to be notable compared to thyroid cancers which occurred prior to the Chernobyl nuclear accident. (ibid, pdf page 2, journal page 204).

However, Malko describes that the lack of latent period period he found in the Belarus Chernobyl exposed population could be explained in terms of the large sample size and the normally low rate of incidence of the disease. That is, where a causative event affects a large population, it is easy to see the increase in incidence of resulting disease. It becomes possible, with little or no doubt, to assign cause to effect if the cause is a strong trigger, the normal incidence of the disease is low, and the population affected by the cause is large. (Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancers in Belarus, Mikhail V. MALKO, Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus.)

In contrast, Yamashita et al 1998 call for more research in the matter.

US CDC publication of “Minimum Latency & Types or Categories of Cancer” John Howard, M.D., Administrator World Trade Center Health Program, 9.11 Monitoring and Treatment, Revision: May 1, 2013, http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/pdfs/wtchpminlatcancer2013-05-01.pdf states that the latent period for Thyroid cancer is :
“2.5 years, based on low estimates used for lifetime risk modeling of low-level ionizing radiation studies”, pdf page 1.

Given that authorities as diverse as Malko, Belarus, US CDC/9.11 Health Monitoring and Treatment, USA, and Yamashita et al 1998 all contradict Yamashita post March 2011, I conclude that the following statement issued to the public and the media by Fukushima Medical University in relation to the rapid rise in cases of thyroid cancer cases suffered by the children of Fukushima, as monitored by the University, to be in error:

“Researchers at Fukushima Medical University, which has been taking the leading role in the study, have said they do not believe the most recent cases are related to the nuclear crisis.”

They point out that thyroid cancer cases were not found among children hit by the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident until four to five years later.” end quote.
Japan Times. Kyodo. 06/05/2013 http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/06/05/national/fukushima-survey-lists-12-confirmed-15-suspected-thyroid-cancer-cases/#.UbCB7Ovrk7A

Further : “…experts at Fukushima Medical University said that it is too early to link the cancer cases to the nuclear disaster. They said the 1986 Chernobyl accident showed that it takes at least four to five years before thyroid cancer is detected.” Source: Thyroid cancer hits Fukushima
5 Jun 2013, 12:57 pm – Source: AAP, SBS TV Australia, http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1774837/Thyroid-cancer-hits-Fukushima

I conclude that the dogmatic stance taken by Yamashita and the Fukushima Medical University since March 2011 is an extreme position which contradict highly qualified authorities. Including Yamashita, pre March 2011.

I further conclude that the stance taken by Yamashita and the Fukushima Medical University is contrary to the direct observation made by all the authorities cited above. Yamashita et al 1998 report a direct observation of the Chernobyl experience in this matter and cite as their source the Chernobyl-Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project. The relevant public document issued by this source is : Chernobyl A Decade – Proceedings of the Fifth Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Symposium, Kiev, Ukraine, 14-15 October 1996 (International Congress S.)
Shunichi Yamashita (Edited by), Yoshisada Shibata (Edited by)

I conclude that I am dumbfounded at the fact that at a time when Dr Yamashita was directly involved in the Fukushima Medical University’s health survey of radiation exposed children in Fukushima, and while that organisation was engaged in examining the children, as it still is, for thyroid disease, it cited Chernobyl as proof of a five year latent period for the disease screened for when in fact it knew that the Chernobyl findings directly contradict the statements being made and which continue to be made, by Fukushima Medical staff.

I am further dumbfounded by the fact that a key leader in the Fukushima health survey conducted by the Fukushima Medical University was the same Dr Yamashita who was indeed involved in the creation and publication of the relevant Chernobyl source data and in it’s subsequent academic study and publication. A key finding of which was “tumors
arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” (Yamashita et. al., 1998, pdf page 2, journal page 204). The authors consider this rapid onset of disease to be notable compared to thyroid cancers which occurred prior to the Chernobyl nuclear accident. (Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus,Yamashita et al,First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan. pdf page 2, journal page 204).

This 1998 finding in relation to radio-genic Thyroid cancer is further supported by the following 2004 finding:

Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure
Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD

From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California.

“Latency Period of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Tumors

Although some sporadic tumors unrelated to radiation may be included among our patients, the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively (Fig. 1).” As published in Journal List nAnn Surg v.239(4); Apr 2004 PMC1356259, available full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1356259/

Medico-legal opinions may be appropriate in court, but at the moment, the children of Fukushima require rapid diagnosis and treatment, not legal argument.

2. The Delay in Follow Up Examinations and Surgery Experienced by the Fukushima Children

On the 5th of September 2013, a press article in Japanese was published by by SHUEISHA on the WPB News site.

Stephen Walker, living in Japan, provides an English translation of this article which is located at https://nuclearhistory.wordpress.com/2013/09/05/fukushima-child-thyroid-cancer-august-2013/

The article reads as follows:

The Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey—set up to examine the impact of radiation exposure from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident—is being conducted on children who were aged 18 or younger when the accident occurred.

In the survey, children undergo ultrasound throat examinations, which look for such thyroid abnormalities as nodules and cysts. The results of these examinations are announced periodically.

On August 20, at a meeting of the Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey Review Committee in Fukushima city, an interim report was presented on the results of the survey during the year ended March 31, 2013. At the previous committee meeting in June, it was reported that 12 children had confirmed diagnosis of thyroid cancer. At the August 20 meeting, the number had risen by six, to 18 cases. What does this number actually mean? One of the lawyers acting for litigants in the Fukushima group evacuation lawsuit, Kenichi Ido, explains.

“The prevalence of child thyroid cancer is said to be one in one million. However, Fukushima has a population of around two million, and the current survey covers approximately 360,000 children. Just looking at these results, we can clearly see that the number of cases is much higher than should be expected. Would it not be reasonable to assume that some abnormal situation has occurred?

However, at the Review Committee meeting, Professor Shinichi Suzuki of Fukushima Medical University, which is leading the survey, said that a characteristic of thyroid cancer is that it develops slowly. Based on the size of the melanomas of those diagnosed with thyroid cancer, he stated, “I believe these (cancers) did not form within the last two or three years.” To date, the committee has consistently denied any linkage between the nuclear accident and the 18 confirmed child thyroid cancer cases.

The Prefectural Health Management Survey has the explicit aim of “resolving the health-related anxiety of Fukushima residents”. However, many mothers in the prefecture are voicing their concerns over the way the survey is being conducted. “At the examinations, we are not told any results at all. Some time later, all we receive is a letter saying whether or not a second exam is necessary. If we were to take our children for a thyroid examination at an ordinary clinic, the doctor would tell us immediately if there were any abnormality, such as a nodule, and the size of the nodule.” (Mother of two, resident in Fukushima city)

Lawyer Ido believes that the survey results reports themselves are also leading to distrust. “The interim report on survey results for the year ended March 31, 2013, has been released. According to this, 953 children required secondary examinations. Of these, 30 children were reported to have ‘malignancies or suspected malignancies’. But if we look at the fine print of the report, we find that of the 953 children who required secondary exams, only 594 children have actually undergone these exams. In other words, 359 children have yet to receive these secondary examinations. Statistically speaking, there are almost certainly going to be cases of ‘malignancies or suspected malignancies’ among those children”.

However, at the Review Committee, the results announcement gave the impression that all secondary examinations had been completed. What, in fact, is the likely number of children with thyroid cancer?

Ido says, “In the survey to date, a total of 43 children have been diagnosed with ‘malignancies or suspected malignancies’—13 in the year ended March 31, 2012, and 30 in the year ended March 31, 2013. Among those still to receive secondary exams, if the rate of thyroid caner is the same as those who have undergone the exams, my calculations estimate a total of 79 children. The survey for the current year ending March 31, 2014, covers another 160,000 children. So potentially I think around 100 children have already developed thyroid caner.”

One hundred—but that includes “suspected malignancies”, doesn’t it?

Ido explains, “Although some cases are presented as “suspected”, when cytological diagnosis has been carried out following the second exam—this is the basis for the final judgment on whether the cyst or nodule is malignant—in all but a single case cancer has been confirmed. Hence, even though the initial results may be stated as “suspected”, there is an extremely high probability that the final diagnosis will be caner. The 18 cases reported on August 20 are only those who have completed the cytological diagnosis”.

While it is shocking that 18 children have already been confirmed to have thyroid caner, it is likely that many times that number will also be diagnosed with cancer. How are the people of Fukushima reacting to this reality?

“Parents with a high awareness of the risks are taking it very seriously. They are saying things like, ‘My kids were in the clear this time, but who knows about the next exam?’ Just recently, there was a family who moved to Kobe (in western Japan). The father had been against moving, but he changed his mind when he realized the risk to his children of staying. But there are a lot of people who say. ‘It’s a worry, but what can you do?’ For those in their 50s or 60s, a lot just give up and say ‘It’s too late anyway’”. (Housewife, 50s, resident in Koriyama city)

The results announced on August 20 should have grabbed the headlines and stirred heated debate. In fact, the announcement received only minimal coverage in newspapers and on television. The news barely reached the general public. It seems that even worse news will be needed before people start paying attention.

Reporting: Naoto Tonsho
© SHUEISHA INC. Thanks to Stephen Walker for this translation of the report.

The official release of information without full explanation for the public:

http://www.fmu.ac.jp/radiationhealth/results/20130820.html

The parents of the children involved in the health survey report delays in receiving examination results, what the results mean, delays in follow up examination.

The Fukushima Medical University maintains that newly diagnosed cancers were not related to the radiation exposure the children suffered from March 2011 on. Even though the survey has been ongoing for some time. To quote the article:
“Professor Shinichi Suzuki of Fukushima Medical University, which is leading the survey, said that a characteristic of thyroid cancer is that it develops slowly. Based on the size of the melanomas of those diagnosed with thyroid cancer, he stated, “I believe these (cancers) did not form within the last two or three years.”

Does thyroid cancer develop slowly?

As we have already seen, thyroid cancer developed in the case of the Chernobyl cohort very rapidly. It surprised both international and local medical authorities, including Dr Yamashita. ( Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.
Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S., First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan. Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9. : “tumors
arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” (ibid, pdf page 2, journal page 204).

Yamashita edited the source data relating to the Chernobyl exposed cohort which is published as Chernobyl A Decade – Proceedings of the Fifth Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Symposium, Kiev, Ukraine, 14-15 October 1996 (International Congress S.)
Shunichi Yamashita (Edited by), Yoshisada Shibata (Edited by)

There are several questions to ask about the speed of growth of Thyroid cancer. The Latency of the disease is one factor. The rate at which the tumor grows is another. Both of these factors depend upon expert observation of vulnerable individuals in this case.

The delay in examinations, whether primary examinations, follow up examinations, subsequent periodic examinations or whatever the nature of the examination the FMU chooses to undertake determines when changes in individuals take place. Medical observation is an act. Multiple sources state that early onset thyroid cancer may grow rapidly. Fukushima Medical University claims the relevant Chernobyl data supports their repeatedly stated view. The Chernobyl data for the early period – from the event and with in the immediate period after – shows rapid latent period, and rapid development of disease. One of the sources for this data is Yamashita et. al 1998.

What do other authorities say about the speed of growth of tumor size in the case of the Chernobyl cohort? Did the tumors all grow at the same slow rate as claimed by Dr Suzuki and FMU? Dr Yamnashita, Dr Suzuki and other Fuskushima Medical University staff have repeatedly cited the Chernobyl experience and data as a basis for their actions and determinations. We have seen that these individuals and the FMU have claimed a 5 year latency period occurred in cases of Thyroid cancers arising from exposures due to the Chernobyl accident. And we have seen that this 5 year latency period does not in fact exist. There are minimum and maximum latency periods, and it has been shown above that the latency period can be very short. As Dr Yamashita himself reported in 1998. It can as little as 12 months or less. The heightened risk of contracting thyroid cancer as a result of radiation exposure in fact follows the exposed person for the rest of their lives. This is the fundamental conclusion from Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure
Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD, From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California.

These researchers state: “the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively”. end quote.

Further, Yamashita et al in 1998 found that ““tumors
arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” (Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus. Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S. First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan. Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9. pdf page 2.

When Dr Yamashita, Dr Suzuki and Fukushima Medical University regularly refer to their stated long minimum latent period and slow growth of thyroid cancer observed, they claim, in the Chernobyl cohort, did they really expect that noone would go and check the literature?

The staff engaged in the FMU thyriod survey, including Dr Yamashita and people who worked in the survey with him, and cite research from Chernobyl which Yamashita helped create and study, claim, in this case, that the growth of thyroid cancer was slow in the case of the Chernobyl. And we can see that Yamashita et al in 1998, on studying the data report in a learned paper that “tumors arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” The source data, and there are numerous authors beside Yamashita, states the opposite of what Yamashita and Fukushima Medical University claim for it.

Again, I am dumbfounded. “Surprising rapidity” in development as actually found in the Chernobyl cohort is the exact opposite of what the FMU staff, which previously included Dr Yamashita, are now claiming for that data.

But the data they cite was and remains published. And so anyone who knows of the published papers can look at it to compare if the claims made of it by Fukushima Medical University and its staff are true or false. One can find many authors who support Yamashita et al 1998. All these authors of the Chernobyl data state that in the immediate period after Chernobyl latent period was very short, and that growth of disease was rapid in these early onset cases. And that for those who are not early onset cases, risk remains high throughout life of developing the disease.

Dr Suzuki claims in 2013 that the Chernobyl data says thyroid cancer develops slowly. The actual Chernobyl data, which Dr Yamashita helped create and then helped study, says that “tumors arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.”

The reader of my conclusions here does not have to merely believe or disbelieve me. This is not a matter of belief. One can check what was written about these things. When an expert cites a source, then people listening or reading that expert must be able to go and check the source. It is not about belief, it is about the accuracy of the report. The reports made by Fukushima Medical University and its staff to the public about the speed of growth of thyroid cancer tumors at Chernobyl is false. That is not my judgement, that is what the source says. And the source authors include Dr Yamashita. He contradicts himself and the Fukushima Medical University contradicts the 1998 reports and other published reports of latency and speed of growth of the disease.

Dr Yamashita is an expert in the early onset cases of Thyroid cancer suffered by the Chernobyl children, a disease characterized in learned journals by Yamashita, et al, and others as a disease which develops rapidly. Yet he and other staff engaged in the Fukushima Medical University Thyroid Health survey completely contradict what is known about the relevant disease in the early period post exposure. And this contradiction is stated and is the basis for the actions and determinations of the staff involved in the survey.

If a doctor says to another doctor “this tumor grows fast” , (as happened with the published work in 1998 and with other sources) but then says to potential patients and other parties “this tumor grows slow” , who is being informed of the truth?

It is not true that early onset thyroid cancer grows slowly. The opposite has been reported by diverse authorities to be the case.

Is working slowly and with delayed action really imbuing the community with trust in authorities? Is the lack of explanation of examination results really informing the community of reality?

Dr Yamashita has repeatedly asked the people involved in the health survey to ” feel safe”. On what basis ? That fast in Chernobyl is slow in Japan?

Is Thyroid cancer “Fast” or “Slow”? Can it be both?
Yamashita et al 1998 finds it to be fast, Yamashita et al 2011-2013 claims it to be slow. On the basis of the findings reported earlier.

Professor Sir E Dillwyn Williams MA, Mb, BChir
Christ’s College Cambridge.
Christ’s College, St Andrew’s Street, Cambridge, CB2 3BU, UK

Citation: Thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident;
Chernobyl accident; lessons learnt, an update. 2010.
Sir Dillwyn Williams
Cambridge
http://ec.europa.eu/energy/nuclear/radiation_protection/doc/scientific_seminar/2010/sir_d_williams_thyroid_cancers_after_chernobyl_accident.pdf

“Tumours are becoming less aggressive” Williams, as above, 2010. (ie late onset)

“regional lymph node metastasis, extension to surrounding tissues or lung metastasis did not differ significantly (between children in Belarus and in Japan)”. Yamashita et al. 1998 (Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.
Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S. First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan. Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9. Abstract

I conclude that Williams in 2010 finds that new cases of thyroid cancer in the Chernobyl cohort were becoming less aggressive.

I conclude that this implies that thyroid cancer which occurred earlier in the Chernobyl cohort were more aggressive.

I conclude that Dr Yamashita was aware in 1998 that thyroid cancer in children in both Chernobyl affected areas and in Japan did suffer thyroid cancer which, in some cases, resulted in the spread of cancer to lymph and lung tissue.

I conclude that Dr Yamashita is aware that the Chernobyl affected children in the immediate aftermath of that event suffered thyroid cancers which could develop quickly and grow rapidly. Yamashita et al. reported this in 1998.

I conclude on the basis of multiple sources that there is no basis for the statement that thyroid cancers have a long latency period only.

I conclude on the basis of multiple sources that there is no basis for the statement that thyroid cancers develop and grow slowly. Yamashita et al 1998 reported an observed rapid onset and rapid development of disease in the case of Chernobyl

I conclude that individuals within a cohort, while sharing a causative event, remain individuals who experience individual disease development and progression. The situation is not either / or , it is both/and. In Chernobyl, the case repeatedly by FMU, both early and later onset occurred, and both rapid and slow disease progression occurred.

I further conclude that there will be a range of latency periods within the Fukushima cohort, as there continues to be within the Chernobyl cohort. A child of the Chernobyl cohort who does develop thyroid cancer as a child carries an increased risk of developing thyroid cancer as an adult.

Fukushima Medical University holds to the view of a singular disease onset period and a singular disease rate of development and a singular health outcome in the case of a large population of children who have many individual characteristics. These children face increased risk due to a common and acknowledged exposure to a causative agent.

It appears that the Fukushima Medical University seeks to impose the experience of the late onset Chernobyl cohort onto the Children of Fukushima. 2010 was 24 years after Chernobyl. 2013 is only 2.5 years after Fukushima Diiachi.

There is great need for openness and correct reporting by medical authorities in Japan.

Public trust will not be gained by official omission, misrepresentation and delays.

3. Are Children the sole part of the Fukushima cohort exposed to increased risk?

Williams, Cambridge, 2010 reports the following:
A study of the risk to adults is also urgently needed, because of conflicting data.
The evidence in relation to dietary iodine strengthens the need to eliminate I deficiency,
and to consider long term iodine supplementation after exposure.”

Malko points out the confounding influence of the aging of members of exposed cohorts. If diagnosis is delayed until a child is a teenager or until a teenager is an adult, due to the changes of risk with age, cause and effect linkage may be lost.

Even though, had the child been diagnosed as a child rather than as a teen etc, the cause and effect linkage would remain intact.

I have included a graph created within an excel spreadsheet from data provided by : Center for Cancer Control and Information Services,
National Cancer Center, Japan

Matsuda A, Matsuda T, Shibata A, Katanoda K, Sobue T, Nishimoto H and The Japan Cancer Surveillance Research Group. Cancer Incidence and Incidence Rates in Japan in 2007: A Study of 21 Population-based Cancer Registries for the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) Project. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 43: 328-336, 2013

This graph shows the rapid change in incidence of thyroid cancer in various age ranges, female, Japan. National data. The rapid change began in 1986- 1987 and continued for some years. The data shows the numbers of cases diagnosed in each year in each age range.

The data shows that childhood is not the only age group which is vulnerable to thyroid cancer in Japan.

Other authors, such as Baba et. al. have published papers in this regard in the pre Fukushima era.

The Characterization of Chernobyl Findings by Fukushima Medical University’s Thyroid Survey

The Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey examines the thyroid glands of children subject to exposures as a result of the Fukushima Diiachi nuclear accident.

The Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey Review Committee issues reports and its staff communicate with residents and the press.

The Fukushima Medical University takes the lead role in the survey. Dr. S. Yamashita previously headed the team engaged in the survey. The current head is Dr. Suzuki.

The staff of FMU have often been quoted in the press. These staff frequently state that Chernobyl data shows that 1. the latent period for Thyroid cancer is 4 – 5 years. 2. the progression of disease was slow in the case of the Chernobyl children.

The following quotations give examples of the characterization given to the Chernobyl findings by Fukushima Medical University and Health Management Survey Staff:

“Researchers at Fukushima Medical University, which has been taking the leading role in the study, have said they do not believe the most recent cases are related to the nuclear crisis.”

They point out that thyroid cancer cases were not found among children hit by the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident until four to five years later.” end quote.
Japan Times. Kyodo. 06/05/2013 http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/06/05/national/fukushima-survey-lists-12-confirmed-15-suspected-thyroid-cancer-cases/#.UbCB7Ovrk7A

Further : “…experts at Fukushima Medical University said that it is too early to link the cancer cases to the nuclear disaster. They said the 1986 Chernobyl accident showed that it takes at least four to five years before thyroid cancer is detected.” Source: Thyroid cancer hits Fukushima 5 Jun 2013, 12:57 pm – Source: AAP, SBS TV Australia, http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/1774837/Thyroid-cancer-hits-Fukushima

What does the Chernobyl data show?

1. Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.
Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S.
First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan.
Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9.

https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/endocrj1993/45/2/45_2_203/_pdf Free Full Text.

This source states: “The high incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus is suspected to be due to radiation exposure after the Chernobyl reactor accident” (Abstract) (pdf page 2, journal page 204).

“All of the preceding thyroid carcinomas developed after longer latency periods,
whereas tumors arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” (pdf page 2, journal page 204).

The authors cite the Chernobyl-Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project as a source in the Abstract. The public data published by this organization is Chernobyl A Decade – Proceedings of the Fifth Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Symposium, Kiev, Ukraine, 14-15 October 1996 (International Congress S.) Shunichi Yamashita (Edited by), Yoshisada Shibata (Edited by)
The publication is available at : http://www.smhf.or.jp/data01/chernobyl_decade.pdf

2. Chernobyl Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancers in Belarus
Mikhail V. MALKO
Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus Krasin Str. 99, Minsk, Sosny, 220109, Republic
of Belarus: mvmalko@malkom.belpak.minsk.by
http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/NSRG/reports/kr79/kr79pdf/Malko2.pdf
QUOTE: ” absence of marked latency period is another feature of radiation-induced thyroid cancers caused in Belarus as a result of this accident. “

3. “Minimum Latency & Types or Categories of Cancer” John Howard, M.D., Administrator World Trade Center Health Program, 9.11 Monitoring and Treatment, Revision: May 1, 2013,
http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/pdfs/wtchpminlatcancer2013-05-01.pdf states that the latent period for Thyroid cancer is :
“2.5 years, based on low estimates used for lifetime risk modeling of low-level ionizing radiation studies”, pdf page 1.

4. Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure
Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD

From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California.

“Latency Period of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Tumors

Although some sporadic tumors unrelated to radiation may be included among our patients, the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively (Fig. 1).” As published in Journal List nAnn Surg v.239(4); Apr 2004 PMC1356259, available full text at
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1356259/

5. Thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident;
Chernobyl accident; lessons learnt, an update. 2010.
Sir Dillwyn Williams
Cambridge
http://ec.europa.eu/energy/nuclear/radiation_protection/doc/scientific_seminar/2010/sir_d_williams_thyroid_cancers_after_chernobyl_accident.pdf

“Tumours are becoming less aggressive” Williams, as above, 2010. (ie late onset)

2010 was 24 years after the exposure events caused by the Chernobyl disaster.

2013 is 2.5 years after the Fukushima Diiachi disaster exposure period commenced.

On the basis of the evidence presented above I ask the following question:

Do the staff of Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey, Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Survey Review Committee, Fukushima Medical University, Doctor S. Yamashita and Dr Suzuki characterize the Chernobyl Findings in a manner which contradicts the actual findings of those relevant Chernobyl related peer reviewed, qualified, published papers?
If so, why?

Further, Williams, Cambridge, as cited above provides data which shows that the form of the disease varies in it’s nature according to dose. The minimum dose band, like the other dose bands, remains associated with exposures due to the Chernobyl disaster.

For more detail and information on the papers, please the previous post at

https://nuclearhistory.wordpress.com/2013/09/06/a-comparison-of-yamashita-et-al-1998-and-national-thyroid-cancer-data-in-japan/

Please also see the source documents cited above at the links given.

My comments on this post and the preceding post are copyright waived. My comments are not of great importance. What is of great importance are the source documents and the deviancy shown by the relevant authorities who have apparently mis-characterized the ?Chernobyl experience for the last 2.5 years.

If anyone knows how to get this to Lawyer Ido in Fukushima, please forward the link to him.

The Nuclear Economy Drive : What a Difference 2 Decades Make, Dr Gale

http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/1991-04-28/features/9101210651_1_nuclear-weapons-plants-nuclear-issues-nuclear-war

Counting The Cost Nuclear Plant Disclosures Shatter Public`s Trust In Government.
April 28, 1991|By ROBERT PETER GALE, Special to the Los Angeles Times

The Chernobyl reactor accident dramatically changed attitudes toward nuclear issues — especially regarding the potential consequences of a nuclear war.

A few years ago a Soviet general told me, “We have looked into hell with Chernobyl.“ Reactions like this surely influenced the Soviet Union`s willingness to negotiate the intermediate nuclear forces reduction treaty and led, ultimately, to ending the Cold War.

With this phase of our postwar history ended, the United States is tallying the cost. Ironically, Americans may have been the major victims. The Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency recently disclosed data on the handling of radioactive substances at nuclear weapons plants, especially plutonium production at Hanford, Wash.

The Hanford plant, besides contaminating the air, dumped radioactive materials into the soil that reached the water supply, including the Columbia River, where radioactive fish have been detected.

The result was that almost 250,000 people in Washington, Oregon and Idaho were exposed to forms of radioactive iodine, strontium-89, cesium-137 and other radionuclides.

Some children living downwind of the plant received thyroid radiation doses that can cause hypothyroidism and thyroid cancer.

Especially troubling is a recent disclosure that technetium-99 and iodine- 129 were found in soil samples. If you think plastic-foam boxes are a problem, consider these radioisotopes, which will be around for 2 million to 160 million years.

Making matters worse is a recent Department of Energy report that several radioactive-waste storage tanks at Hanford produce combustible gases and pose an imminent risk of exploding. Similar problems are thought to affect other nuclear weapons production, research and testing sites throughout the United States.

The Department of Energy has recently released data regarding radiation exposure to workers in nuclear weapons plants and at test sites, affecting about 600,000 people. Other civilian exposures occurred at or near sites in Washington, Nevada, Idaho, Colorado, Georgia and Ohio.

After 45 years, the burden of proof is shifting from the victims to the government. As many as 2 million Americans may have been exposed to radiation because of the nuclear arms race.

Certainly similar events have occurred in the Soviet Union. Claims of radiation-related ill-health from Soviets living downwind of the Semipalatinsk test site in Kazakhstan are remarkably similar to American “down-winders.“ Also, the Soviet authorities recently released data confirming an explosion at the Kyshtym nuclear wastes storage site in the Urals in 1957; scores of towns suddenly disappeared from official maps; a huge area remains contaminated. In September, an explosion in a nuclear fuels plant at Ust-Kamenogorsk released beryllium, a toxic non-radioactive chemical, over a large and densely populated area.

Why has the U.S. government suddenly decided to discuss these issues? Several factors most likely are responsible.

First, the end of hostilities and seeming imminent economic collapse of the Soviet Union make it difficult to justify classifying such data as military secrets.

Next, the environment is rapidly becoming the global political issue for the 1990s.

Finally, these are problems that will not go away with time (the half-life of plutonium-239 is 24,000 years). Better address them now. end quote. Yessir Dr Gale Sir.

Then, 2 decades later

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/ill-drink-radioactive-water-says-nuclear-safety-adviser/story-e6frg6so-1226029610477

I’ll drink radioactive water, says nuclear safety adviser Dr Robert Gale

by: Rick Wallace, Tokyo correspondent
From: The Australian
March 29, 2011 12:00AM

AN international medical specialist on radiation has played down the risks to human health of the crisis at the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan.

Robert Gale, who led the medical response to the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, backed the current 20km evacuation zone as “arbitrary but reasonable” and said he was happy to drink iodine-contaminated water even beyond the 300 becquerel per kilogram limit set by the Japanese.

“We live with radioactive water all the time,” Professor Gale said in Tokyo yesterday.

“Would I stop drinking water in Tokyo or take any special precautions? Absolutely not. These limits are arbitrary. They’re meant to protect the most sensitive members of the population. They accept very low levels of risk.”

News that tapwater in parts of Tokyo and other affected prefectures last week rose above the 100 becquerel per litre limit of iodine 131, caused by fallout from the nuclear plant, sparked panic buying of bottled water supplies.

Professor Gale, who is advising the Japanese government on the Fukushima crisis, said that to prevent alarm, it needed to give better context to the information it was releasing on radiation levels.

“I don’t think proper attention has been given by any government – not only by the Japanese government – to the transmission of information to the public as to what these radiation hazards mean,” he said.

The professor criticised foreign governments for imposing different exclusion zones to those ordered by Japan. The US imposed an 80km evacuation zone for its nationals, a move that was soon followed by Britain, Australia and other countries.

end quote.

Why the difference between the USA in 91 and Japan 2011 Gale?

The Japanese government advised parents not to give tap water to infants and young children in Tokyo.

Gale waltzes in and apparently counter-commands it. Meanwhile, in 91 he was all for cleanup and justice for Americans. Oh well.

Medico-legal aspects of Disaster

The response of the state and corporation, to any disaster they cause, is medico-legal before anything else.

The first responder enters an accident scene having identified hazards and removed them. The first act on the casualty is to support life. The second act is to reassure.

When the state and corporation fail as first responders, no one believes their words.

When the state and corporation issue edicts in place of reassurance, people respond with hate.

When the state and corporation offer interrogation in place of due diligence and watchful oversight, the people rebel.

Even as Dr 100 mSv uses the children to gather false evidence against them.

It turns that the states and corporations of the world sure did watch closely as the Downwinders of the First Nuclear Age fought their government for justice.

The imposition of dose response mathematics by authorities upon nuclear victims; the imposition of compulsory perceptions of hazard and harm : These things cannot prevent the eventual dialogue between the diverse groups who have suffered.

Such a conversation takes place with language. Not mathematics.

In the private spaces owned by individuals, scattered worldwide, the private conversation does not centre around what the official dose count was. Rather, it centres around the individual’s experience of the whole event over time. And the individual compares what has really happened to each with the generic lies uttered by the imposers.

Governments and corporations will do anything for a buck.

This time, people are gathering their own evidence.

As always, when it gets to court, there will be arguments about dose, dose rate and dose response. And this time, as always, there will be bountiful evidence listing the officially issued lies and omissions. The defendant is a known and documented lier and habitual provider of significant omissions.

In the long run, as always, it will cheaper to just come clean.

Dr Yoko Yanagisawa Addressing Health Meeting, Jan 2013
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=3jA6pVJJT4Q

An Example of Excluded Nuclear Victims

http://www.nevadadesertexperience.org/issues/consequences.htm

Utah cancer survivor says Atomic Testing Museum ignores the plight of downwinders
By Christopher Smart
The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake Tribune

LAS VEGAS – When Michelle Thomas was growing up in the 1950s and ’60s, her mother tacked up a hand-drawn map of their St. George neighborhood. She would mark an “X” for every house where someone had cancer.

That diagram – filled with dozens of X’s – isn’t on display at the newly opened Atomic Testing Museum on Las Vegas’ storied Flamingo Road. But that isn’t what angers Thomas. “It’s like we didn’t even exist,” says the lifelong St. George resident. “As a downwinder, that’s deeply offensive.”

Aided by a wheelchair last week, Thomas toured the new 8,000-square-foot facility that highlights the development of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas.
She sees the museum as a monument to the bomb with little attention to its price in human lives. “In a word,” she says, “propaganda.”

Thomas can walk with a cane, but her polymyositis – the degenerative autoimmune disorder she has endured for the past 30 years – makes it difficult. Born in 1952, just after the onset of above-ground nuclear testing, she also has suffered from ovarian cysts, breast cancer and a benign salivary gland tumor.

The $4.5 million museum – built with public and private funds, including handsome donations from defense contractors Bechtel and Lockheed Martin – harks to the final days of World War II and the dawn of the Cold War. The Defense Department, called War Department during World War II, and the Atomic Energy Commission were racing to develop the atomic bomb to defeat the Japanese and, later, the hydrogen bomb to stave off the Soviets.

The museum is replete with technological and cultural timelines that encompass both the forward march of nuclear arms capability as well as pop icons like Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley. It features mock civilian bomb shelters as well as other signs of the times, like women sporting atomic hairdos.
Thomas groans upon spying a life-size cutout of a nude Miss Atomic Bomb, a beauty pageant winner whose private parts are covered by a mushroom cloud.

“That’s ironic,” she smirks. “We’ve all had cancer of the ovaries and breasts.” But while the museum and its gift shop boast kitschy trinkets, the bulk of the exhibition is serious and sobering. “The purpose of the museum is to capture the history of the Nevada Test Site and nuclear testing in general,” explains curator Bill Johnson. Exhibits emphasize the huge national undertaking that was the arms race. “If there is a message,” Johnson says, “it is that the Cold War really was a war.”

But people in southwestern Utah’s Washington County and thousands of other downwinders were unwilling participants, “guinea pigs” who were lied to about the effects of radioactive fallout, Thomas says. “We are veterans of the Cold War. But we didn’t sign up,” she says. “We were always told the government was very interested in our health. We thought, ‘Oh, aren’t we lucky.’ “

Federal officials tested St. George schoolchildren’s thyroids twice a year, Thomas recalls, and sometimes recommended the gland be removed. During bomb tests, residents were advised to stay indoors. “It was like, ‘Go inside and watch “I Love Lucy” for a couple of hours and everything will be fine.’ “

At the Las Vegas museum, visitors get a glimpse of the violence in an above-ground nuclear test in a small auditorium. After a countdown, benches vibrate as the screen shows a roiling nuclear explosion. Blasts from air cannons mimic the shock wave.

Al O’Donnell, an 82-year-old museum docent who worked at the test site for all 100 above-ground explosions between 1951 and 1968, says the blasts were vital to America’s security.
“What I did, I did to protect the liberty of the United States,” he says during a 10-minute video. “I’d do it all over again.”

As the auditorium lights go up, Thomas struggles to hold back tears and tells O’Donnell, who is standing nearby, that she paid a price for the testing. “I’ve been walking with a cane all my life and my friends are dead. I don’t have the freedom you talked about.”

In an emotional exchange, O’Donnell tells Thomas he is sorry for the pain and suffering that came out of the tests. He also concedes that many of his colleagues died from the radiation. “I’m afraid to go up to St. George,” he says. “I’m afraid they’d stone me to death.”

Dina Titus, a professor of political science at University of Nevada-Las Vegas, also makes an appearance on the bomb-test video, noting that downwinders indeed were misled by the government. Her two-minute monologue is among the examples that curator Johnson and others point to as attempts to include downwinders in the museum.

In an interview with The Salt Lake Tribune, Titus, who criticizes the weapons program in her 1986 book Bombs in Our Backyard, explains that at the onset of the testing, southern Utah residents backed the program, portrayed to them as vital to the nation’s security.

“Not only were they harmed, but they were lied to by the people who said they would protect them,” Titus says. “It was like a double whammy.” A downwinders exhibit should be added, Titus says. The price they paid was too high. “It wasn’t worth it, to put people at risk like that.” The museum’s most important function, Titus adds, is that it houses all the records from the 928 tests at the Nevada site (828 below ground) between 1951 and 1992. Among those documents is government evidence dating to the late ’40s and early ’50s that fallout is hazardous.

Despite such knowledge, the downwinders’ battle for recognition and compensation took almost 40 years. After meeting 27-year-old Connie Selzer, of Washington, D.C., during the tour, Thomas worries that many museum patrons will walk away with little or no knowledge of downwinders.
“It’s a whole side of the story I didn’t know about,” Selzer says after chatting with Thomas. “It’s like not knowing about the Holocaust.”

Near the tour’s end, Thomas looks quizzically at an exhibit that includes a chunk of 9-11 World Trade Center wreckage. The Cold War and the creation of the nuclear weapons were fueled by fear and hate, she says. “This is a reminder to be afraid.” Talk of resuming nuclear testing – including from Utah Congressman Chris Cannon – baffles Thomas. “It’s like going back 50 years when they came to town and said, ‘Don’t be afraid,’ ” she says. “For them to say that now is serious crazy-making.”
csmart@sltrib.com

Atomic Testing Museum

* Location: 755 E. Flamingo Road, Las Vegas.

* Hours & Admission Prices

* (Posted for educational and research purposes only, in accordance
with Title 17 U.S.C. section 107) * end quote

The nuclear weapons detonated at the Nevada Test Site produced around the same fallout as the Chernobyl disaster.

FMU HAS DECADES OF NUCLEAR EXPERIENCE TO DRAW ON AS IT LIES TO THE PEOPLE.

I CONCLUDE THAT THE USE OF RESEARCH WHICH FINDS TO THE CONTRARY OF THE PROPAGANDA SPREAD BY THE AGENTS OF NUCLEAR INDUSTRY IS MOST CERTAINLY “SCIENTIFICALLY APPROPRIATE” WHEREAS THOSE WHO ACCUSE UNBIASED RESEARCH OF BEING VOODOO AND INAPPROPRIATE SHOULD TELEPORT THEMSELVES BACK TO SALEM between February 1692 and May 1693. THEY WILL BE QUITE AT HOME. SOCIAL ENGINEERING, WHILE CONSIDERED A SCIENCE BY DESPOTS, IS NOT MEDICINE. NEITHER ARE THE EXPOSURES WHICH ARE INFLICTED ON HEALTHY PEOPLE WITHOUT CONSENT AND WITHOUT MEDICAL NEED, AND WITHOUT THE BENEFIT OF DATA KEPT SECRET BY THE JAPANESE GOVERNMENT TO ALL BUT THE INNER ELITE AND THE UPPER ECHELON OF THE US GOVERNMENT (see “SPEEDI DECEPTION”).

SO FAR THEY HAVE LIED ABOUT LEAKS, EMISSIONS, EVACUATIONS, SAFE DOSES, FOOD, CASUALTIES. THEY HAVE ROUGHED UP AND DEPORTED AT LEAST ONE CANADIAN JOURNALIST, AND HAVE PASSED SECRECY LAWS.

BELIEVE WHO YOU LIKE, BUT WHEN YOU READ THE PAPER OR THE CRAP THE LIKES OF BARRY BROOKS PUTS OUT, DEMAND TO KNOW THE SOURCE AND WHERE TO GET IT. HOW MANY LITTLE PLASTIC BAGS WILL IT TAKE TO CLEAN UP JAPAN, BARRY? OFF YOU GO MATE, TAKE THE ENTIRE STAFF OF ADELAIDE UNI WITH YOU AND EVERY PLASTIC BAG FOODLAND WILL SELL YOU. TAKE PAM WITH Y0U FOR A DIP IN FUKUSHIMA HARBOUR. IDIOT.

AS FOR THAT IDIOT RADIOLOGIST WHO BOASTS ONLINE OF BREACHING ARPANSA AND WORKPLACE OH&S AT THE ADELAIDE RADIOLOGY CLINIC, WELL, I LOOK FORWARD TO BEING YOUR PATIENT ONE DAY MATE.

YOU WILL NOT KNOW WHAT HIT YOU. AS FOR YOUR DISRUPTING THE FUKUSHIMA LECTURE AT UNI SA, YOU COMMITTED THE SIN OF NOT DECLARING THAT YOU ARE A PAID AGENT OF THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. SO LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU WHEN YOU TREAT MY CANCER WHEN I GET IT. SMUCK.

The Minimum Latent Period for Thyroid Cancer according to the literature pre 311

those who disagree with Yamashita 2013 : https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/…/45/2/45_2_203/_pdf Free Full Text.

Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.
Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Yamashita S, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S.
Source

First Department of Internal Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Japan.

Endocr J. 1998 Apr;45(2):203-9. 2. http://www.smhf.or.jp/data01/chernobyl_decade.pdf
Chernobyl A Decade – Proceedings of the Fifth Chernobyl Sasakawa Medical Cooperation Symposium, Kiev, Ukraine, 14-15 October 1996 (International Congress S.)
Shunichi Yamashita (Edited by), Yoshisada Shibata (Edited by)

3. http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/…/kr79/kr79pdf/Malko2.pdf

Chernobyl Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancers in Belarus
Mikhail V. MALKO
Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus Krasin Str. 99, Minsk, Sosny, 220109, Republic
of Belarus: mvmalko@malkom.belpak.minsk.by QUOTE: ” absence of marked latency period is another feature of radiation-induced thyroid cancers caused in Belarus as a result of this accident. “ 4 Minimum Latency & Types or Categories of Cancer” John Howard, M.D., Administrator World Trade Center Health Program, 9.11 Monitoring and Treatment, Revision: May 1, 2013, http://www.cdc.gov/wtc/pdfs/wtchpminlatcancer2013-05-01.pdf states that the latent period for Thyroid cancer is :
“2.5 years, based on low estimates used for lifetime risk modeling of low-level ionizing radiation studies”, pdf page 1. 5. Latency Period of Thyroid Neoplasia After Radiation Exposure
Shoichi Kikuchi, MD, PhD, Nancy D. Perrier, MD, Philip Ituarte, PhD, MPH, Allan E. Siperstein, MD, Quan-Yang Duh, MD, and Orlo H. Clark, MD

From the From Department of Surgery, UCSF Affiliated Hospitals, San Francisco, California.

“Latency Period of Benign and Malignant Thyroid Tumors

Although some sporadic tumors unrelated to radiation may be included among our patients, the shortest latency period for both benign and malignant tumors was 1 year as occurred in 3 patients, whereas the longest time was 69 and 58 years, respectively (Fig. 1).” As published in Journal List nAnn Surg v.239(4); Apr 2004 PMC1356259, available full text at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1356259/

All of these reports contradict Fukushima Medical University 2013 and Yamashita 2013.

THE MINIMUM LATENT PERIOD FOR THYROID CANCER HAS BEEN REPORTED IN PEER REVIEWED MEDICAL JOURNALS AS BEING LESS THAN THE 4-5 YEARS CLAIMED BY FUKUSHIMA MEDICAL UNIVERSITY AND DR YAMASHITA 2013.

There is apparent self interest in quoting a longer minimum latent period in Japan by nuclear authorities and nuclear funded medicos in that country. In my opinion.

Impact of I131 on Native Americans from era of nuclear weapons tests

Impact of I131 on Native Americans from era of nuclear weapons tests

Disease risk persists for more than the half life of a radionuclide:

Risk Analysis Vol 20, No. 1, 2000

“The Assessment of Radiation Exposure In Native American Communities from Nuclear Weapons Testing in Nevada”

Eric Frohmberg, Robert Goble, Virginia Sanchez and Dianne Quigley

Abstract: “Native Americans residing in a broad region downwind from the Nevada Test Site during the 1950s and 1960s recieved significant radiation expopsures from nuclear weapons testing. Because of differences in diet, activities and housing, their radiation exposures are only very imperfectly respresented in the Department of Energy dose reconstructions. There are important missing pathways, including exposures to radioactive iodine from eating small game. The dose reconstruction model assumptions about cattle feeding practices across a year are unlikely to apply to the native communities as are other model aussumptions about diet. Thus exposures from drinking milk and eating vegetables have not yet been properly estimated for these communities. Through consultation with members of the affected communities, these decificiencies could be corrected and the dose reconstruction externded to Native Americans. An illustration of the feasibility of extending the dose reconstruction is provided by a sample calculation to estimate radiation exposures to the thyroid from eating radio-iodine contaminated rabbit thyroids after the Sedan nuclear test. The illustration is continued with a discussion of how the calculation results may be used to make estimates for other tests and other locations.” end quote.

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/causes/i131/abouti131

US National Cancer Institute download page with links to the following pages and download:

* About I-131
* How Americans Were Exposed
* The Milk Connection
* The Government’s Response
* I-131′s Rapid Breakdown
* Key Facts
* Get the Facts About Exposure to I-131 Radiation (Brochure)
* Get the Facts About Exposure to I-131 Radiation (Presentation)
* I-131 and Thyroid Cancer – Flip Chart for Native Americans (PDF)

Text from
I-131 and Thyroid Cancer – Flip Chart for Native Americans
Quote:
Am I at risk?
The amount of I-131 people absorbed depended on:
1. Their age during the testing period (between 1951 and
1963)
2. The amount and source of milk they drank in those years
3. Where they lived

6. People born between 1936 and 1963
People with the highest risk of developing thyroid
cancer from exposure to I-131 were children during the
period of atomic bomb testing, and are now 40 years of
age or older.
• People younger than 15 at the time of testing (between
1951 and 1963) probably have a higher thyroid cancer
risk from exposure to I-131 fallout than other people.

Milk drinkers

Children’s thyroid glands were smaller and still growing
when they were exposed to I-131. And children were
more likely to have consumed milk, which could have
exposed them to I-131.
• Babies who were breastfed may have been exposed to
two to three times as much I-131 as their mothers. But if
their mothers did not drink large amounts of fresh milk,
babies likely received little additional exposure from
breast milk.
• Babies who drank formula or condensed milk were not
exposed at all.
• People received little exposure from eating fruits and
leafy vegetables as compared to drinking fresh milk.
This is because I-131 fell on the surface of the fruits and
vegetables. So peeling or washing them removed most of
the I-131. Little I-131 was transferred to the inside of the
plant.

The amount of milk people drank played a role in how
much I-131 they were exposed to. So did the source of
the milk.
• Fresh milk from backyard or farm cows and goats usually
contained more I-131 than store-bought milk. This is
because processing and shipping milk allowed more time
for the I-131 to break down.
• Goat’s milk generally contained more I-131 because
goats concentrate significantly more I-131 in their milk
than cows do.

Where did I-131 go?

Where people lived as children is another risk factor.
• I-131 was carried thousands of miles away from the test
site by winds.
• Because of wind and rainfall patterns, the distribution
of fallout varied widely after each test. Therefore, certain
areas of North America received more fallout than other
areas.
• Scientists think that the largest amount of I-131 fell over
parts of Utah, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, and Montana.
But I-131 traveled to all states, especially those in the
Midwest, East, and Northeast United States.

Exposure to I-131 may increase a person’s risk of getting
thyroid cancer.
• Thyroid cancer accounts for less than 2 percent of all
cancers diagnosed in the United States.
• Most of the time, thyroid cancer is a slow-growing
cancer. With treatment, it can usually be cured.

The United States is not Fukushima.

You may want to visit a doctor based on 4 key factors:
1. Age—if you are 40 or older, especially if you were born
between 1936 and 1963
2. Milk drinking—if you drank a lot of milk as a child,
especially milk from farm or backyard cows and goats
3. Where you lived as a child—if you lived in the
Mountain West, Midwest, East, or Northeast U.S.
4. Medical signs—if you have a lump in your thyroid
gland
People who think they may be at risk for thyroid cancer
should discuss this concern with their doctor. The doctor
may suggest a schedule for checkups.

NIH Publication No. 02-5286
Printed September 2002

end quote

Latent time is much more important than half life time in determining onset date range of radiogenic disease. Diminishing rates of radionuclide presence does not represent to a static population reducing risk – the risk is established by the total exposure. Thus, in 2002, publication date of the quoted document, weapons test fallout exposure to I131 was still causing
disease onset. The publication remains relevance, even though it is more than 8 days since the last atomic bomb was detonated by the United States upon its own people.

Japan may well attempt to control information by equating Fukushima with nuclear bomb testing, however the Japanese government cannot justify its own current exposures of its people to the fallout of radionuclides from Fukushima on the basis of the false belief that nuclear weapons testing was harmless, for it patently was not harmless. And that false assumption is patently at the core of the recent public statements made by members of the Japanese elite in the past week.

If the Japanese government is attempting to use the same techniques used by the Western nuclear powers to quell voters during the period of nuclear weapons testing, the method hopefully will backfire. Assuming voters in Japan don’t have short memories.
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“http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3171289/

Proc Jpn Acad Ser B Phys Biol Sci. 2011 July 25; 87(7): 371–376.
doi: 10.2183/pjab.87.371
PMCID: PMC3171289
The discoveries of uranium 237 and symmetric fission — From the archival papers of Nishina and Kimura
Nagao IKEDA*1†
Editor: Toshimitsu YAMAZAKI
Author information ► Article notes ► Copyright and License information ►
Go to:
Abstract

Shortly before the Second World War time, Nishina reported on a series of prominent nuclear physical and radiochemical studies in collaboration with Kimura. They artificially produced 231Th, a member of the natural actinium series of nuclides, by bombarding thorium with fast neutrons. This resulted in the discovery of 237U, a new isotope of uranium, by bombarding uranium with fast neutrons, and confirmed that 237U disintegrates into element 93 with a mass number of 237.”

Mr Abe, Nishina rolls in his grave at your stupidity.

As for local heroes, this is way over the frontal lobes of the South Australia Minister for public works who claimed, when minister for mines, in March 2011 in front of an audience of uranium mining execs on a junket at the Hilton Hotel (The Pay Dirt Conference) “No-one will dies from Fukushima Diiachi.”

The Lancet has not published the Minister’s speech yet.

Though Dr Yamashita, the dude appointed to initially head the monitoring of the health of Fukushima children responded by concocting a new, unique in the world, minimum latent period for thyroid cancer in children of “4-5 years”. A position maintained by the Fukushima Medical university ever since.

Wonder when Yamashita is going to get around to amending his 1998 paper on the matter. He visited Chernobyl many many times. And noted at in his paper that thyroid cancer in Belarus and Ukraine appeared “very rapidly” after the disaster at Chernobyl. He also noted that once induced by the reactor “accident”, the rate of growth of the cancers was “rapid”.

Breathtaking revisionism from Japan’s Mr Chernobyl. And of course, when Yamashita cite’s Chernobyl as a precedent, which he does, he cites himself. And he knows of course that his post 3/11 crap is absolutely contradicted by his own published peered reviewed paper of 1998.

The endocrine system is most important in mediating the body’s response to the damage inflicted by radiological insult.

Kids who have had heir thyroid glands removed would seem to be at a disadvantage in this regard.

During the 1970s the number of new cases of childhood thyroid cases per year was less than 20. For the whole of the nation of Japan.

Since March 2011, the number of new cases of childhood thyroid cases, as determined by Dr Yamashita and the Fukushima Medical University, has totaled 44 (to September 2013). Not for the whole nation of Japan, but merely for the cohort of children living in the affected area of Fukushima Prefecture.

Yamashita and the Fukushima Medical University maintain that none of the afflicted Fukushima children contracted their cancers due to radiological insult from the nuclear disaster of March 2011.

These authorities justify their position by citing Chernobyl research, which, they claim, proves that thyroid cancer in areas close in affected by the Chernobyl reactor disaster did not contract thyroid until after 4 years had elapsed.

Consulting the record shows that Yamashita himself observed that early onset childhood thyroid in Ukraine and Belarus post Chernobyl occurred very rapidly and that once invoked, those cancer grew very rapidly.

Fukushima Medical University staff engaged in the Thyroid health survey of Fukushima children cite sources based on Chernobyl data which the staff claims support 1. A long 4-5 year latent period for thyroid cancer 2. A slow progression of the disease. In fact these sources actually confirm that latent periods in early onset cases of the disease post Chernobyl were very short, and these sources report that disease progression in the early onset cases post Chernobyl was rapid. The authors of these Chernobyl reports include Dr S. Yamashita, formerly of the Fukushima Medical University Fukushima Thyroid Health Survey.

“Childhood thyroid cancer: comparison of Japan and Belarus.“
Yamashita S, Shirahige Y, Ito M, Ashizawa K, Motomura T, Yokoyama N, Namba H, Fukata S, Yokozawa T, Ishikawa N, Mimura T, Sekine I, Kuma K, Ito K, Nagataki S.:
“tumors arising in the Chernobyl population began developing with surprising rapidity and short latency.” (Yamashita et. al., 1998, pdf page 2, journal page 204). The authors consider this rapid onset of disease to be notable compared to thyroid cancers which occurred prior to the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

Source: Center for Cancer Control and Information Services,
National Cancer Center, Japan

Matsuda A, Matsuda T, Shibata A, Katanoda K, Sobue T, Nishimoto H and The Japan Cancer Surveillance Research Group. Cancer Incidence and Incidence Rates in Japan in 2007: A Study of 21 Population-based Cancer Registries for the Monitoring of Cancer Incidence in Japan (MCIJ) Project. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology, 43: 328-336, 2013 Download Source Data as Excel spreadsheets at http://ganjoho.jp/pro/statistics/en/table_download.html

. http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/BF02035773.pdf
Deposition of gamma-emitting nuclides in Japan after the reactor-IV accident at Chernobyl‘

Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Volume 116, Issue 2 , pp 291-306
Cover Date 1987-12-01
Authors

M. Aoyama (1)
K. Hirose (1)
Y. Sugimura (1)

Author Affiliations

1. Geochemical Laboratory, Meteorological Research Institute, Nagamine 1-1, Yatabe, 305, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, (Japan)

Abstract

The wet and dry deposition of gamma-emitting nuclides are presented for Tsukuba and eleven stations in Japan following the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl’. In Japan fallout from the reactor at Chernobyl’ was first detected on May 3, 1986, a week after the accident. Abruptly high radioactive deposition, which mainly consists of131I,132I,103Ru,137Cs and134Cs, was observed in early May. The cumulative amount of131I,103Ru and137Cs in May at Tsukuba were 5854±838 Bq·m−2, 364±54 Bq·m−2 and 130±26 Bq·m−2 (decay was corrected to April 26), respectively. The monthly137Cs deposition in May corresponds to 2.5% of the cumulative137Cs deposition during the period from 1960 through 1982. Most of the Chernobyl’ radioactivities, especially131I, are scavenged from the atmosphere by the wet removal process. end quote.

I have a question for the Fukushima Medical University. When did nuclear industry commence in Japan?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dkai_Nuclear_Power_Plant

“The Tōkai Nuclear Power Plant (東海原子力発電所 Tōkai genshi-ryoku hatsuden-sho?, Tōkai NPP) was Japan’s first nuclear power plant. It was built in the early 1960s to the British Magnox design, and generated power from 1966 until it was decommissioned in 1998. A second nuclear plant, built at the site in the 1970s, was the first in Japan to produce over 1000 MW of electricity.”

Fukushima and the Privatization of Risk

Fukushima and the Privatization of Risk
Majia Holmer Nadesan

“The Fukushima nuclear disaster is among the worst nuclear accidents in history. What environmental and public health effects can be expected from the widespread radiation contamination? Majia Holmer Nadesan offers a detailed look at the Fukushima disaster, examines evidence of contamination in Japan and North America, and reviews preliminary research on the human and environmental effects of the disaster. Her findings are contextualized in relation to historical and present understandings of ionizing radiation and genomic instability.”

Majia Holmer Nadesan

Majia Holmer Nadesan is a professor at Arizona State University. She has published a number of books examining the bioethics and biopolitics of social governance and human welfare: Constructing Autism, Governmentality, Biopower, and Everyday Life, and Governing Childhood: Biopolitical Strategies of Childhood Education and Management. Her work addresses how powerful market forces, state sovereignty, and expert knowledge shape public health and welfare.

macmillan.com/fukushimaandtheprivatizationofrisk/MajiaHolmerNadesan

Thanks for the early Christmas present Majia.

Reuters reports on the reality of nuclear refugees.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/11/japan-fukushima-idUSL2N0IV09120131111

For many Fukushima evacuees, the truth is they won’t be going home

By Sophie Knight and Antoni Slodkowski

IWAKI, Japan Mon Nov 11, 2013 12:08am EST

Nov 11 (Reuters) – For many of Japan’s oldest nuclear refugees, all they want is to be allowed back to the homes they were forced to abandon. Others are ready to move away, severing ties to the ghost towns that remain in the shadow of the wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant.

But among the thousands of evacuees stuck in temporary housing more than two and a half years after the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl, there is a shared understanding on one point – Japan’s government is unable to deliver on its ambitious initial goals for cleaning up the areas that had to be evacuated after the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster.

“You can’t have a temporary life forever,” said Ichiro Kazawa, 61, whose home was destroyed by the tsunami that also knocked out power to the Fukushima plant.

Kazawa escaped four minutes before the first wave. Next year, he hopes to return to a home within sight of the Fukushima plant and take his 88-year-old mother back. But he wants the government to admit what many evacuees have already accepted – for many there will be no going home as planned.

“I think it will be easier for people who can’t go back anyway to be told that so they can plan their future,” said Kazawa, who remains unemployed.

Lawmakers from Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s coalition parties will recommend to Abe as soon as Monday that his government step back from the most ambitious Fukushima clean-up goals, according to the proposal, reviewed by Reuters.

They will urge the government to begin telling evacuees that a $30 billion clean-up will not achieve the long-term radiation reduction goal set by the previous government. At the same time, the Abe administration is set to pledge another $20 billion for decontamination and building long-term storage for radiated waste, an official involved told Reuters.

The Abe government is also considering a proposal floated earlier this month to offer new compensation to residents in the areas of highest radiation who have no prospect of returning home, officials involved have said.

“There will come a time when someone has to say, ‘You won’t be able to live here any more, but we will make up for it’,” the secretary general of the LDP, Shigeru Ishiba, said in a speech earlier this month.

FRUSTRATION, RESIGNATION

Around a third of the 160,000 people forced to flee when the earthquake and tsunami triggered a triple meltdown at the Fukushima plant remain in flimsy temporary housing units that are nearing the 3-year limit initially promised.

Social workers report an increase in domestic strife, alcoholism and illnesses such as deep vein thrombosis from lack of exercise. In August, the number of people in Fukushima who have died since the accident from illnesses related to prolonged evacuation rose to 1,539, nearing the prefecture’s tsunami death toll of 1,599.

Among those who remain, there is frustration, resignation and a sense that the hardest decisions remain ahead.

“Politicians preferred to make people believe in something and put off making really difficult decisions until as late as possible,” said Hideo Hasegawa, who runs a non-profit group in Fukushima helping evacuees.

The evacuation area – a little bigger than Hong Kong – was carved into three zones in late 2011 based on radiation readings. The most contaminated area was predicted to remain uninhabited for at least five years and remains off limits.

The Ministry of Environment has contracted work to clean up the 11 most heavily contaminated townships, with the aim of bringing the average annual radiation dose to 20 millisieverts per year based on a range suggested by the International Centre for Radiological Protection.

Current policy dictates that evacuation orders be lifted and compensation payments stopped when that level is reached. However, the government also set a lower, long-term target of 1 millisievert – twice the background radiation in Denver.

Some had hoped the decontamination project employing thousands of temporary workers to strip trees, spray roads and remove topsoil would be enough to hit that ambitious target.

Officials had cautioned from the start against those hopes, since 90 percent of the projected reduction in radiation comes from natural decay of radioactive particles over time.

DELAYS, DUMPING

Meanwhile, decontamination work has been marred by delays and reports that workers have sometimes simply dumped waste rather than collect it for later storage. The environment ministry has pushed back the deadline for completion for seven of 11 townships and has yet to announce new target dates.

Some evacuees remain concerned that 20 millisieverts per year poses health risks, especially for children. That dose over five years is the limit for nuclear workers. Many have stuck with the target of 1 millisievert as a yardstick for safety.

“No matter how hard they try to decontaminate, radiation isn’t going down. So even though we have decided to go back, we can’t,” said Keiko Shioi, a 59-year-old housewife from Naraha, near the nuclear plant. Radiation near her house is running at two to three times the long-term target, she said.

Just 12 percent of evacuees from Tomioka, one of the most heavily contaminated villages, say they want to return home, according to a survey published in September.

“No matter how much they decontaminate I’m not going back because I have children and it is my responsibility to protect them,” said Yumi Ide, a mother of two teenage boys from Tomioka.

Evacuees are equally worried about a lack of jobs, schools, medical care or even groceries in towns that have been abandoned since 2011.

“It doesn’t make any sense to return people to towns with no infrastructure,” said Norio Horiuchi, 71, a retired engineer from Tomioka.

end quote

One aim of the control of information and the distortion of the facts from March 2011 to August 2013 was to facilitate passivity in the target population.

At least they didn’t use violin quartets at the rail head.

The evacuation zone is too small. It is the failure of the nuclear authorities and government to tell the truth to nuclear refugees which is the cause of the problem. The fact is the evacuation was needed due to the poisoning of the living space by nuclear industry from March 2011 and its failure to come to grips at developing any real way of rehabilitating that living space. The consequences of nuclear failure – all to real and which happens all too often, is devastating. The failure to tell the truth, mainly in the service of face saving for nuclear industry, is the prime cause of heightened suffering, needless extra suffering, among nuclear refugees. If government had the courage to attend to the need for truth, things would be better than they are.

Meanwhile, there continue to exist idiots, such as Flinders University, who maintain that evacuation was not needed at all. Right Pam?

By the way, where are the soil samples taken to the USA by DOE in June 2011? What were the full readings and substances found?

NO CHILD IS THE PROPERTY OF NUCLEAR INDUSTRY TO EXPERIMENT UPON AND LIE TO.

After Meltdown, Nine Months Of Drift For Fukushima Survivors

December 13, 2013

www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CC8QqQIwAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.npr.org%2F2013%2F12%2F11%2F249773680%2Fafter-meltdown-nine-months-of-drift-for-fukushima-survivors&ei=R1yqUqPmG8iGkgX0q4DoDw&usg=AFQjCNELlcJYqaD7xgneDXqAs8r-EZCwsQ&bvm=bv.57967247,d.dGI

After Meltdown, Nine Months Of Drift For Fukushima Survivors

by
December 11, 2013 2:00 PM

Nuclear Nation

Director: Atsushi Funahashi
Genre: Documentary
Running Time: 145 minutes

“Atomic energy makes our town and society prosperous,” reads a sign photographed by filmmaker Atsushi Funahashi for Nuclear Nation. By the time he shows this small-town civic motto, the irony is unmistakable: Japan’s nuclear-power industry may have enriched society, but it has left this particular city desolate.

The place in question is Futaba, which borders the Fukushima Daiichi nuke plant. Funahashi shows Futaba mostly in exile; after four of the six reactors failed on March 12, 2011, the town’s residents were evacuated. As of April 2011, 1,415 of them were living in an abandoned high school in Saitama, the prefecture that holds much of Tokyo’s northern sprawl.

Over the nine months the movie chronicles, about half the refugees leave the school building. Many return to the Fukushima area, but none to Futaba, which is still radioactive and officially off-limits. When a bus trip is organized so former residents can retrieve treasured belongings — for one, that means Mad Max and Planet of the Apes DVDs — the visitors are allowed only two hours within the hot zone.

Despite its title, the film spends little time analyzing Japan’s macro issues as a “nuclear nation”; the director, who also served as editor and main cinematographer, sticks with the Futaba refugees. His approach is direct, intimate yet respectful, and sometimes as mournful as the stark piano-and-flute score. Both movie and music proceed slowly, although probably faster than in the original version, which was nearly an hour longer.

The principal characters include Mayor Katsutaka Idogawa and a father-son team, Ichiro and Yuiichi Nakai, who use their two hours in Futaba to pray for the soul of the wife and mother who died in the aftermath of the earthquake, tsunami and nuke-plant hydrogen explosions.

When the movie leaves the Saitama shelter, it’s usually to follow the mayor or other residents on a mission. Some of them stage a march in Tokyo, protesting Futaba’s abandonment. There, in a classic clueless-politician moment, one elected representative bows solemnly to a demonstrator and asks, “Where are you from?”

Sometimes, though, the nation comes to the evacuees. The emperor and empress pay a visit, and a military band arrives to perform sad enka ballads and a tune that vows, “We love our Fukushima home.” There are also letters and promises of compensation from the national government and the Tokyo Electric Power Co., which some find disappointing. “It would have been nice to receive something more heartfelt,” remarks a shelter resident.

Each new reactor brought an influx of cash, Idogawa explains, but only temporarily. After all the construction, Futaba was still one of the 10 poorest towns in the country. That’s why the mayor endorsed two more reactors, whose construction had been scheduled to begin just a month after the disaster.

By mid-2011, the mayor had changed his mind about nuclear power — not that it mattered much. He still had an office, but it was in a high school some 150 miles away from a town he couldn’t even visit.

Idogawa and the Nakais aren’t the documentary’s only mavericks. There’s also farmer Masami Yoshizawa, who insists on feeding and watering his cattle, even though the animals are too radioactive to have any economic value.

“I’m committed to letting these cows live,” says Yoshizawa. That sentiment, given the circumstances, seems rather more inspiring than “Atomic energy makes our town and society prosperous.”

General Motors flees the country. The PM says “Let the workers eat Yellowcake”

December 13, 2013

http://australianpolitics.com/2013/12/11/abbott-shorten-clash-over-holden-closure.html

“While I accept that the economy of South Australia is fragile, while I accept that Adelaide in particular has suffered a series of knocks, it lost Mitsubishi just a few years ago and it did come through and there is much that we can be hopeful and optimistic about in the resilience of the South Australian economy particularly if government can do all that is necessary to ensure that the Olympic Dam mine expansion goes ahead.” The Prime Minister. Allegedly of Australia.

When the US and Japan stops printing money in order to lower the value of their currencies, and lower the value of their debts to China, the Australian will fall. For the actually the movement in ultimate value is NOT in the Australian dollar, but in the US dollar and the yen.

Bechtel and General Atomics will be pleased.

” Bob Katter, question to PM THURSDAY 12 DEC 13‏

Actions

Paul Langley
12:35 PM
To: Bob.Katter.MP@aph.gov.au
Picture of Paul Langley

Could I please have a transcript of Mr Katter’s question (regarding the floating Australian dollar) to the PM made in parliament on Thursday 12 12 13 regarding the impact on Australian workers and employers, businesses, farms, factories and the community? The points made by Mr Katter
are of great importance and I thank him for asking the question.

If possible please also supply a transcript of the PM’s reply.

Yep, Mr Katter was misrepresented but thanks so much for asking the question Mr Katter.

Paul Langley

Awaiting transcript of Bill Shorten’s questions and comments made in Parliament 12 12 13 also.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh!_What_a_Lovely_War

War is economics by other means.

Spill of contaminated material at Ranger uranium mine; December 2013

December 7, 2013

ERA says “Happy Christmas World, get used to it”
http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/20201659/spill-of-contaminated-material-at-ranger-uranium-mine-locals-fear-for-kakadu-national-park/

Spill of contaminated material at Ranger uranium mine; locals fear for Kakadu National Park

The operators of the Ranger mine in the Northern Territory say a spill of uranium and acid has been contained, and there will be no impact to the environment.

A huge tank in the processing area of the mine failed about 1:00am (ACST) on Saturday.

The tank containing radioactive material burst open and its contents flowed outside the banks meant to keep any leaks contained.

As much as 1,000 cubic metres of slurry was spilled at the mine site near Jabiru.

Workers had discovered a hole in the side of the tank and were evacuated before the tank burst and the slurry escaped.

The mine’s operator, Energy Resources of Australia (ERA), says no-one was injured and no uranium leaked off the site into the surrounding Kakadu National Park.

But traditional owner groups say they are “sick with worry” about the potential environment impact.

Photos of the site taken by the Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation and supplied to the ABC suggest material did spill onto grassy ground at the site.Â

ERA spokesman Tim Eckersley says there is no environmental emergency.

“They evacuated the area and at about 1:00am the tank basically split at the bottom and the processing slurry, which is a mixture of mud and water, has spilled out the bottom of the tank.

“That’s the beginning of our processing operations, so it’s a mixture of ground-up uranium ore and acid.”

He said the material mostly spilled onto compacted earth, tarmac and drains.

“It’s very impervious material so there’s very little chance of it leaking into the soil there,” Mr Eckersley added.

The company said earlier in a statement the slurry moved outside the containment area, but was captured and contained on-site.

“As the material was contained within the processing area there is no impact on the environment surrounding the Ranger project area,” the statement said.
Investigation begins as anti-nuclear campaigners slam company

Federal Environment Minister Greg Hunt has ordered an immediate clean-up and investigation.

A spokesman for the minister said the leak has been contained and will have no impact on Kakadu National Park.

But the Northern Territory Environment Centre is calling for an immediate halt to operations at the mine.

The centre estimates around 1 million litres of acidic radioactive material spilled from the processing tank.

Anti-nuclear campaigner Lauren Mellor says it is the third safety breach by the ERA in a month.

“Just within this month we’ve had an incident where a controlled vehicle was able to leave a secure area of the mine and was halfway down the Arnhem Highway before it was located,” she said.

“We’ve had four barrels found in the rural area in Darwin, four barrels used to transport uranium were discarded with no explanation.”

Greens Senator Scott Ludlam has called for an indefinite suspension of operations at the Ranger mine.

“It is hard to imagine a worse time for Environment Minister Greg Hunt to be deregulating the uranium sector and leaving it to the states and territories,” he said in a statement.

“This is an industry that demands much tighter regulation as we go down the path to permanently phasing it out.

“The writing has been on the wall at Ranger for a long time. This disaster may well be the last nail in this accident-prone mine.”
Traditional owners call for audit of mine

The Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation (GAC), which represents the Mirarr traditional owners of the area, says this is one of the worst nuclear incidents in Australian history and has called for an audit of the site’s facilities.

“People living just a few kilometres downstream from the mine don’t feel safe,” GAC chief executive Justin O’Brien said.

“How can we trust the assurances of a company which has repeatedly failed to safely manage this highly toxic material? What may happen next?

“It’s a catastrophic failure on the part of not only the operator but also the government regulators in the Northern Territory and Canberra.”

It is not yet known how long it will take for work to resume at the site.

The company has applied to the Federal Government for a large underground expansion of the mine, called the Three Deeps project.

Traditional owners have not yet given their approval.

Ranger uranium mine leaks – decades of promises plainly arrogant lies.

December 7, 2013

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2010-02-09/uranium-mine-leak-5400-times-normal-level/325276

Uranium mine leak ‘5400 times normal level’
Emma Masters

Posted Tue 9 Feb 2010, 3:46pm AEDT
Map: Darwin 0800

Contaminated water seeping from a mine in Kakadu National Park has a uranium concentration more than 5,000 times the normal level, a Senate estimates committee has heard.

The Office of the Supervising Scientist is the environmental regulator of the Ranger uranium mine, which is owned by Energy Resources of Australia.

The office today told the committee that water seeping from underneath the dam has about 5,400 times the level of uranium than the natural background level.

Greens Senator Scott Ludlam says the environmental regulator told the committee about 100,000 litres of water seeps from the tailings dam every day.

Mr Ludlam says the water has been leaking from the dam for years.

He says the regulator says it will be impossible to rehabilitate the site.

“The uranium concentation in the billabong surrounding the mine are about three to five parts per billion,” he said.

“But the uranium in the processed water that is leaking from beneath the tailings dam is 27,000 parts per billion.

“So it’s roughly 5,500 times as much uramium in that water as there is the surrounding environment and that means the company has got a huge problem.”

He says ERA must make clear the effect it is having on the nearby environment.

“ERA made a quarter of a billion dollars in profit last year,” he said.

“I think the least they can do for the cultural and environmental integrity of Kakadu National Park is do some proper water quality sampling so we know what kind of contamination we are dealing with.”

ERA says it cannot confirm the uranium concentration figure because it says it does not know the context in which it was reported.

The company refutes that 100,000 litres a day are leaking from the dam.

It says the Ranger uranium mine is one of the most environmentally regulated mines in the world.

end quote

ERA admits above that it treats regulations as a joke.

Protests against Northern Territory uranium mining April 2013

December 7, 2013

http://www.miningaustralia.com.au/news/ghostly-protests-against-northern-territory-uraniu

“Australian Mining”, 12 April, 2013 Vicky Validakis

Ghostly protests against Northern Territory uranium mining

Ten people dressed as spectres protested outside Energy Resources of Australia’s head office in Darwin yesterday, in opposition of plans to expand uranium mining in the Northern Territory.

As Australian Mining reported yesterday, Energy Resources of Australia say a new uranium mine in the Northern Territory will play an important role in future energy needs.

The company is seeking approval for the proposed Ranger 3 Deeps underground uranium mine.

The miner has also allocated $57 million for a prefeasibility study into the development of the underground mine.

However, environmentalists say they do not want the mine to go ahead near Kakadu National Park.

“Uranium from Kakadu was used at Fukushima,” said Anna Wiggs of Stuart Park, NT news reported.

“Kakadu is a world heritage area and it’s still broken into sections not included in the national park. It’s a disgrace.”

Police looked on as protesters climbed palm trees on the SkyCity Casino lawns.

Environment Centre NT nuclear-free campaigner Cat Beaton said the group was against ERA’s plans to mine underground.

“We believe the Ranger lease should go like Koongarra and be incorporated into Kakadu National Park,” Beaton said.

“Uranium mining is unique,” she said. “The waste products have the potential to last a long time and do more damage than other mines.”

“Two years ago ERA had to shut down for mismanagement of waste water issues,” she said.

Earlier this year, a survivor of the Fukushima nuclear accident urged governments to reinstate their ban on uranium mining.

Visiting Brisbane as part of a delegation from the Japanese disaster relief organisation Peace Boat, dairy farmer Hasegawa Kenichi said mining uranium was too dangerous.

“Uranium is something the human body cannot handle, cannot cope with. It’s like opening Pandora’s box,” he told AAP.

“This government, all governments, must stop using this substance.

“It must be left underground.”

Disowning Fukushima: Managing the credibility of nuclear reliability assessment in the wake of disaster

December 4, 2013

Disowning Fukushima: Managing the credibility of nuclear reliability assessment in the wake of disaster by John Downer.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rego.12029/abstract

Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013
DOI: 10.1111/rego.12029
© 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

Abstract

This paper reflects on the credibility of nuclear risk assessment in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima meltdowns. In democratic states, policymaking around nuclear energy has long been premised on an understanding that experts can objectively and accurately calculate the probability of catastrophic accidents. Yet the Fukushima disaster lends credence to the substantial body of social science research that suggests such calculations are fundamentally unworkable. Nevertheless, the credibility of these assessments appears to have survived the disaster, just as it has resisted the evidence of previous nuclear accidents. This paper looks at why. It argues that public narratives of the Fukushima disaster invariably frame it in ways that allow risk-assessment experts to “disown” it. It concludes that although these narratives are both rhetorically compelling and highly consequential to the governance of nuclear power, they are not entirely credible.

“Poisoned Power” by Gofman and Tamplin. Complete book.

December 3, 2013

Link to complete book : http://www.ratical.org/radiation/CNR/PP/

by
John W. Gofman, Ph.D., M.D.
and Arthur R. Tamplin, Ph.D.

ratitor’s corner, December Solstice, 1998
heralding the presence on rat haus reality of Poisoned Power, the classic lay-person’s primer explaining precisely what the health costs of nuclear power plants are, as well as describing the historical development of nuclear power in the U.S and how an entire industry was “misled in their belief that some safe amount of radiation truly exists”.

1971:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CARD NUMBER 70-155715

ISBN 0-87857-004-7

1979:
Copyright © 1971, 1979 by John W. Gofman and Arthur R. Tamplin

Permission is granted for downloading, copying, and distribution all or parts of this book, provided that the text and drawings are reproduced without any alterations.

Printed in the United States of America on recycled paper containing a high percentage of de-inked fiber.

Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data

Gofman, John William
Poisoned Power,
Includes biographical references and index.
1. Atomic power-plants—Environmental Aspects.
2. Radioactive pollution. I. Tamplin, Arthur R.,
joint author. II. Title.
TD195.E4G63 1979 333.7 79-16781
ISBN 0-87857-288-0